The trouble with the NET (Part 2) – Alternative Therapies – what’s the harm?

The trouble with the NET (Part 2) – Alternative Therapies – what’s the harm?

Awareness, Diet and Nutrition, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
But it works, I read it on the internet! “But it works… I read it on the internet!”You may remember my article entitled The trouble with the NET (Part 1) which was a lighthearted but still serious discussion about the dangers of self-treatment on the internet. Linked to that blog was a very popular article written by the scientists at Cancer Research UK debunking some cancer myths which seem to regularly patrol the NET and social media.Many well meaning people will send you articles they saw on the 'NET' about this and that treatment which claims to cure cancer.  They also post them on social media increasing the reach to thousands of people, some of whom are not in the right frame of mind to see the risks.  The vast…
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Chemotherapy for Neuroendocrine Cancer

Chemotherapy for Neuroendocrine Cancer

Treatment
Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on whatsapp WhatsApp Share on email Email Edited and checked April 2021 One of the unusual aspects of Neuroendocrine Cancer is that chemotherapy is not normally considered as a 'standard' treatment unlike many other cancers. One exception is high grade (Grade 3) where it is often a first and/or second line therapy. Poorly differentiated Neuroendocrine disease is normally labelled as Neuroendocrine Carcinoma (NEC) but worth pointing out there is now a Grade 3 well differentiated classification known as a 'Grade 3 NET' rather than Grade 3 NEC. Depending on Ki67 score, there could be differing treatment options for Grade 3 NET and Grade 3 NEC. Read more in my articles Staging and Grading and High Grade. Many…
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Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine

Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine

Awareness, Patient Advocacy
OPINIONThere's a constant debate regarding the validity of the term 'Carcinoid'.  I've posted about this a few times and as far as I know, the debate has been raging for some years.EDIT APRIL 2020.  The latest classification system for Neuroendocrine Neoplasms confirms the word "carcinoid" no longer forms part of the terminology used in Digestive System tumours  (effectively removing the term from GEP NETs) - read more - click hereEdit May 2020.  So what about other areas not included in GEPNETs above? Please note there are still loose ends in some of the blue books, particularly Pulmonary, Urinary and Female Reproductive Organs. Hopefully these blue books will be updated in the same way as the others for Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (or will be subsumed into the proposed Neuroendocrine blue book). But in the meantime,…
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Cancer doesn’t take holidays (but I do)

Cancer doesn’t take holidays (but I do)

Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
[caption id="attachment_2911" align="alignleft" width="300"] Mt Jacinto near Palm Springs[/caption] After diagnosis in July 2010, with the exception of a planned holiday to Turkey prior to my 'big surgery', holidays were put on the back burner, there were too many problems and too many risks - not least of which was the lack of overseas insurance cover for my condition. After 2 years of treatment including several surgeries, I was feeling more confident and my body had become stronger, holidays were put back on the agenda, but nothing too strenuous, nothing too far away. We stuck to Europe over the period 2012-2014. However, in 2015, I was getting more confident and managed to get back to one of my all time favourite places - California.  A total round trip of 21…
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No Fear

No Fear

Inspiration, Survivorship
Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on whatsapp WhatsApp Share on email Email It's that time again, every 6 months I need some checks. I've done the specialist blood test (Chromogranin A - CgA) and the 5HIAA and am waiting on my CT scan appointment. It's also time for my annual Echocardiogram. I then see my Consultant and he delivers the news.I positively look forward to my tests and I cannot wait to get into that scanner! 'Scanxiety' isn't in my dictionary.  Why? Because testing is one thing that's going to keep me alive for as long as possible.  If I don't get regularly tested, then one day I might just 'keel over' because something wasn't spotted early enough.  Even in the event…
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