Telotristat Ethyl (XERMELO®) – an oral treatment for Carcinoid Syndrome Diarrhea not adequately controlled by Somatostatin Analogues

Telotristat Ethyl (XERMELO®) – an oral treatment for Carcinoid Syndrome Diarrhea not adequately controlled by Somatostatin Analogues

Treatment
Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on whatsapp WhatsApp Share on email Email 1st Aug 2020  updateIn a move that Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc. chief Lonnel Coats said will focus the company on its phase II neuropathic pain program, The Woodlands, Texas-based venture has agreed to sell one of its two approved products, the carcinoid syndrome diarrhea therapy Xermelo (telotristat ethyl), to Tersera Therapeutics LLCI don't expect this to make any difference to the drug or its supply.  Business as usual.  The outer package may change to reflect new owners but the brand name XERMELO will most likely be part of the sale. Read the news from Lex Pharma - click here. Telotristat Ethyl is an extremely significant introduction to the treatment of Carcinoid Syndrome diarrhea. It's the…
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100,000 blog views – thank you!

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
NET Cancer Blog has just recorded 100,000 blog views. I'm extremely excited to have reached this major milestone. However, I'm also really grateful to my followers on this blog site, on Facebook, on Pinterest, on Google+ and on twitter for supporting me through thick and thin. Your engagement with my blog whether a simple 'like', a share, a comment, a pin, a tweet, a retweet, an email or via a private message; is not only extremely motivating but also very humbling. Thank you so much for giving NET Cancer 100,000 pokes in the eye! Onwards and upwards to 200,000! Ronny I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news. Disclaimer My Diagnosis and Treatment History Most Popular Posts
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I’m only as good as my last scan

I’m only as good as my last scan

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Survivorship
[caption id="attachment_5240" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Scanning - a piece of cake![/caption] "I'm only as good as my last scan". I received this comment last week in response to one of my posts and I thought it was a very pragmatic thing for someone to say. A NET patient under surveillance has regular tests at determined intervals but the one that is most likely to spot disease progression, stability or regression is a scan. Markers such as (say) Chromogranin A (CgA) or 5HIAA are clearly useful but in an ongoing surveillance scenario, they alone would not be used as a firm declaration of progression, stability or regression. Every picture tells a story and a scan is normally the confirmation required whether it's a CT, MRI or PET (etc). IF YOU CAN SEE…
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Dear Doctors – There’s no such thing as a ‘good’ cancer!

Dear Doctors – There’s no such thing as a ‘good’ cancer!

Awareness, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
  At a follow-up meeting during my diagnostic phase in July 2010, the specialist who was investigating my pre-diagnosis secondary care appointment, was clearly suspicious that I had cancer. As the results of my liver biopsy were not yet in, he was not in a position to declare his findings.  However, following my revelation about flushing during this meeting, he immediately guessed the biopsy would confirm Neuroendocrine Tumour (NET).  I can't remember much of the conversation but I vividly remember him indicating that of all the issues out there to get, this was one of the better ones.  He was using a meter analogy action with his hands swinging towards the 'good' reading!  I hadn't gone there that day to receive a cancer diagnosis but he was clearly trying to put me at ease and I'm sure it was with the…
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Running in the Family – Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN)

Running in the Family – Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN)

Awareness, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
We all know that Neuroendocrine Tumours (NETs) and their syndromes are complex but there is even more complexity to be found in a group of related disorders known as Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN).  I recommend all NET patients should try to understand the basics of MEN and vice versa, particularly as both conditions seem to come with a plethora of endocrine related effects. Overview MEN patients will normally have a tumour in at least two endocrine glands - thus the terms 'Multiple' and 'Endocrine' (tumours can also develop in other organs and tissues).  Neoplasia is just another name for tumour and these can be non-cancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant) with the potential to metastasize. MEN syndromes can comprise varying combinations of tumours and many will be aware of the tumour risks from family knowledge.  So putting…
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