RonnyAllan.NET – Community Newsletter January 2018

RonnyAllan.NET – Community Newsletter January 2018

Awareness, Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship, Technical NETs
A great start to the year in both NETs in the news and my social media activity.  Of course the headline is the US FDA approval of Lutathera (Lu-177) - i.e. PRRT I caught this news in my social media NET FDA finally approves PRRT in USA. Long awaited and has caused much excitement on all forms of social media. I'm very pleased for my USA friends but we mustn't forget it's also required in so many other places.  Help me populate locations in my live article on  PRRT click here. NET Epidemiology continues to be discussed and (yet) another well known NET expert confirms my 2 year old article saying that the  disease can no longer be considered rare. I suspect more dominoes will follow. Click here for the evidence. MIDATECH Pharma…
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NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter DECEMBER 2017

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter DECEMBER 2017

Awareness, Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
6 HAPPY NEW YEAR and welcome to Ronny Allan's Community newsletter for December 2017. A quieter month due to the holiday season in the latter half.  I was generally quieter in the first half too, maybe that's a good thing? Nonetheless, I still managed to accumulate nearly 20,000 hits this month. At the end of 2017, I've been reflecting on the amazing support from you guys.  I'm a bit 'discombobulated' but also proud to see that I've had an amazing quarter of a million hits on my blog site in 2017 alone, double the 2016 figure.  It seems almost impossible to carry that momentum on in 2018 but I'll give it a go!  Check out my top 6 posts of 2017 by clicking here. AND ..... I'm now officially ronnyallan.NET…
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NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter NOVEMBER 2017

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter NOVEMBER 2017

Awareness, Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
Welcome to Ronny Allan's Community newsletter for November 2017. A very strong beginning of the month due to massive support for my Halloween themed but very serious and hard-hitting post "Neuroendocrine Tumors - no treats, just tricks". If you've not seen it or commented on it, check it out here on the Facebook site (currently 724 shares). I suspect the number of shares will never be beaten (there were 652 within 36 hours) and as far as I know perhaps this is now the most shared NET awareness post ever on social media. The support for this single post was so phenomenal; it actually eclipsed my entire NET Cancer Day effort on 10 Nov! I am so grateful to those who made that happen ♥ That said, I was actually pretty…
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Drum Roll – Ronny Allan wins WEGO Best in Show ‘Community’ 2016

Awareness, Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
Very happy to win the WEGO 2016 Best in Show Community which is some ways is a recognition for my blog based on the fact is at the core of what I do and in many ways, the other apps are (currently) just 'fronts' for this output.  Whether you read my blog direct from WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or any other platform you find it, you are all members of this award-winning community! My WEGO Profile is here - look out for the updates!  I'll expand this blog once the dust settles as this award opens up new avenues for the Neuroendocrine Cancer (NETs) and I'll be involved in new and exciting activities. Many thanks for everything you've done! Ronny Thanks for listening Ronny Hey Guys, I’m also active on Facebook which comprises the…
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Let’s talk about living with NETs

Let’s talk about living with NETs

Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
[caption id="attachment_4893" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Graphic courtesy of Ellie McDowell[/caption] There's a frequently asked question on certain forums along the lines of "how will I die of my Neuroendocrine Cancer?". Personally, I find it slightly unsettling, although I can understand why certain people might ask. I accept it as a question but I believe there are times and places for it and that a public forum is not the place to have it. The vast majority of people do not go to a forum to find out how they might die.  I can see a list of search terms for hits on my blog site (I don't know who searched just what was searched). Would you believe this also appears from time to time?  I just hope they found this post! I don't tend…
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It’s scary searching Cancer online

Awareness, Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy
[caption id="attachment_6092" align="alignnone" width="500"] that's me in the middle[/caption] When my diagnosing specialist suggested I had Neuroendocrine Cancer, he also told me not to go online whilst we awaited the results of the liver biopsy. I completely ignored that and went online! I very quickly discovered why he said that because the Neuroendocrine Cancer information online in 2010 was indeed scary, despite me being a very experienced user of computers and the internet; and despite me being to some extent, an information worker. It's not just knowing where to look, it's also about the interpretation and knowing what is current and what is out of date.  As a novice NET patient, I found out my 5-year survival rate was only 38%.  It looked like a credible site but I now…
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Don’t worry, I really am OK!

Don’t worry, I really am OK!

Inspiration, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy
[caption id="attachment_6843" align="aligncenter" width="377"] I really am OK![/caption] I read an interesting article in the BBC entitled "Why people keep quiet about their battle with cancer".  The usual range of reactions and fears can be found in this story and it made me think about my own experience. I think there are two key themes involved here: Talking about Cancer Managing your illness Firstly as I have an international audience, I thought I'd introduce what might not be a well-known British trait - the 'stiff upper lip'.  For the uninitiated, I'm defining this as "One who displays fortitude in the face of adversity and within that, exercises great self-restraint in the expression of emotion, rarely asks for help and just suffers in silence."  That perfectly explains the accompanying graphic!  That definition also covers the two key themes above, talking about it…
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Neuroendocrine Cancer Forums: frighteningly good or good at frightening?

Neuroendocrine Cancer Forums: frighteningly good or good at frightening?

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
OPINION When I was diagnosed, I was happy with my own research and kept away from forums on the advice of a fellow patient who said they can be negative. Just before my second major operation in 2011, I decided to take the plunge and registered with an online web forum (not a Facebook one). Looking back to that period, I wasn't really a major player, more of a 'lurker'. I found it quite 'cliquey' and I should have listened to the initial advice of that fellow patient!  So I left it. Joining Forums In 2013, I joined several large Facebook closed groups which function as forums. After 4 years, I felt more experienced and knowledgeable and I wanted to learn more about the disease to help with my blog activity. Be prepared!…
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Dr Google will see you now

Dr Google will see you now

Awareness, Humour, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
  Whenever I need to know anything nowadays, I mostly just look on the internet and sometimes I ask my virtual PA 'Alexa' to look for me!  However, you need to be very careful in acceptance of what is credible information and what isn't. As a relatively experienced health blogger and activist, I like to think of myself as 'internet savvy', so I occasionally find myself using 'Dr Google' to diagnose my aches, pains and unusual feelings (and I confess to using it to help others).  I mostly find there are no real or definitive answers online for patient issues.  Although I seem to learn something on each piece of research, I also find some really worrying stuff.  Some symptoms can have dozens of reasons and I often realise how…
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