“What are you doing this afternoon”

“What are you doing this afternoon”

Awareness, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
On 8th July 2010, I was sat in front of a secondary care consultant, his speciality was colorectal. I asked specifically for this consultant for two reasons, firstly, he carried out a colonoscopy some 20 months previously which turned out to be negative. Secondly, my GP had referred me to the iron deficiency anaemia clinic, and they wanted to do ….. a colonoscopy.  I changed that plan because this "non-issue" was dragging on; quite frankly I wanted it to be resolved quickly, and I wanted it to be resolved in my favour - after all, I wasn't actually ill! Rewind two months, I had an incidental set of blood tests ordered by a nurse following a routine visit to my local medical centre (....... "I think I've lost a bit…
Read More
Ronny Allan’s ‘PoNETry’ © – An Ode to Lanreotide

Ronny Allan’s ‘PoNETry’ © – An Ode to Lanreotide

Humour, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Treatment
You may also enjoy my Invisible Illness 'PoNETry' - click here Ronny Allan's 'PoNETry' © series can be shared with poetry credit to: RonnyAllan.NET and/or NET Cancer Blog Thanks for reading Ronny I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan Disclaimer My Diagnosis and Treatment History Most Popular Posts Sign up for my twitter newsletter Read my Cure Magazine contributions Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life! Please Share this post Please Share this post for Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness and to help another patient
Read More
I may be stable but I still need support and surveillance

I may be stable but I still need support and surveillance

Diet and Nutrition, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy, Survivorship
With incurable but treatable cancers such as metastatic Neuroendocrine Cancer, 'Stable' is normally not the end of the matter, for many there is still a long road ahead and that road may not be straight or flat. The long road may be considered an advantage by some given that with very aggressive cancers, incurable can frequently mean terminal. The surveillance must continue in case of a recurrence. It's important to understand that 'Stable' simply means the disease is "under control" with tests and scans showing the cancer hasn't changed over time. One of the disadvantages of 'incurable but treatable' is that Quality of Life (QoL) can in many cases be compromised due to the consequences of cancer and /or treatment. However, if specialist treatment, surveillance and support are all in…
Read More

Laughter is the best medicine

Humour
How many times have you heard it said that laughter is the best medicine?  I can certainly remember this phrase being said when I was a child.   There is some Science in Medicine (more applied than pure), so where is the scientific evidence for this claim?  Well after all this time, someone has decided to carry out a study.  Apparently when we laugh, we exercise our muscles, get blood flowing, decrease our blood pressure and stress hormones, improve sleep patterns and boost our immune system. It's a new area of research known as 'Psychoneuroimmunology' - the study of how emotions affect our nervous and immune systems. It's still a relatively new area of research, but the insights are promising. The study looked at 20 healthy older adults in their 60s…
Read More
Always thank your Nurse – sometimes they’re the only one between you and a hearse!

Always thank your Nurse – sometimes they’re the only one between you and a hearse!

Inspiration, Patient Advocacy, Treatment
I had minimal exposure to nurses throughout the first 55 years of my life.  I did spend a night in hospital when I was 16 having been knocked unconscious in the boxing ring (you should've seen the other guy). Bar the odd mandatory injection, I avoided both boxing and nurses for many years after that. You may remember I discussed how my cancer was diagnosed following a fairly innocuous conversation at my GP's Surgery in May 2010, see blog post 'Diagnosis - I'm no longer in control'.  That nurse was professional, thorough and she clearly went the extra mile for her patients.  She has my eternal thanks for sending me down a different path in the game of chance that is life.  I often wonder where I would be now had she not ordered the 'just…
Read More
Diagnosis – I’m no longer in control

Diagnosis – I’m no longer in control

Awareness, Survivorship
[caption id="attachment_10806" align="alignnone" width="777"] back in control?[/caption] 'Diagnosis'.  The dreaded moment when you're looking at an Oncologist and waiting to be given some news. I'd been to a routine annual Asthma clinic, referred to my GP, referred to a specialist, had a bunch of tests and now referred to an Oncologist. Rewind 2 months to May 2010......  I was happily working, getting stuff done, making things work. I had sufficient autonomy and freedom of manoeuvre.  I felt in control.  I'm happy as a pig in the proverbial!  My annual Asthma clinic comes along and it's an opportunity to work at home for the day....yahoo - no commuting! "Hi Ronny" - "Hi Liz". Blah Blah Blah. However, glad Liz was taking it seriously - I just wanted to get back to my laptop,…
Read More