SSTR PET – Ga68-DOTA-JR11 vs Ga68-DOTATATE

SSTR PET – Ga68-DOTA-JR11 vs Ga68-DOTATATE

Clinical Trials
Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on whatsapp WhatsApp Share on email Email Headline - 68Ga-DOTA-JR11 was found to detect significantly more liver lesions than 68Ga-DOTATATE; however, 68Ga-DOTATATE detected more bone lesions than 68Ga-DOTA-JR11.Although it had been in trial use for some years in Europe and elsewhere, the formal approval of 68Ga-DOTATATE has led to an increase in the development of other radionuclides, some in conjunction with therapeutic options (i.e. PRRT) making a 'theranostic' approach to diagnosing, treating and surveillance Neuroendocrine Cancer patients with somatostatin receptor positive tumours.  I also wrote last year about another option called 64Cu, something already available in Europe, in particular Denmark.In another development which has been running for some time, a Ga68 variant called 68Ga-DOTA-JR11 has been in trial…
Read More
Neuroendocrine Cancer Clinical Trial – Lutetium-177 OPS-201 (Satoreotide)

Neuroendocrine Cancer Clinical Trial – Lutetium-177 OPS-201 (Satoreotide)

Clinical Trials
What is Lutetium-177 OPS-201? This is a 'next generation' Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) or more specifically the radiopharmaceutical that binds to both activated and unactivated somatostatin receptors which are upregulated on these tumours. There is far higher binding via this mechanism than standard octreotate. The technical name of the radiopharmaceutical is Satoreotide tetraxetan lutetium-177 (author's note, I'm guessing but it could be a variant of Lanreotide).  It was once named JR11. What's the difference to the current approved therapy?  Conventional PRRT (e.g. Lutathera, Lu177 Dotatate) is based on a somatostatin receptor 'agonist' approach, whereas 177Lu Ops 201 Satoreotide is a receptor 'Antagonist'.  The differences are quite technical but in the most layman terms , the antagonist has the capability of attaching (binding) to more receptors, including those in a…
Read More