How to Talk to a Cancer Patient Without Being a Complete Twit

I enjoyed reading “8 rules on how to talk to a cancer patient” because I think much of it is written with ‘tongue in cheek’.  Great title!

In UK we might even spell the word ‘twit’ slightly differently (UK people will get it!). Some of the rules are directed at doctors and I’m sure some doctors will laugh (if you’re a doctor and you didn’t laugh, sorry). I think one or two are a bit harsh and could potentially backfire and at least one I partly disagree with.  Personally I try to balance my reactions to not come over as a ‘pity party’ and something which is genuinely offensive or upsetting to me as a cancer patient.  I appreciate understanding and empathy, perhaps sympathy, but I certainly don’t want pity.

I’ve added rule number 9 which is a true story I picked up in my own community which I found absolutely unacceptable and I certainly did not laugh.  Thanks to ‘Patient A’ for the quote.

Read the 8 rules here:

https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/how-to-talk-to-a-cancer-patient-without-being-a-complete-twit

You may also enjoy this article which contains 16 ‘red flags’ that might mean it’s time to find a new doctor.  Easier in some countries than others and I suspect we have all encountered at least one of them.  I don’t think we should be changing doctors too often and we shouldn’t be changing just because of one of these ‘red flags’ (although the example above is pretty offensive).

16 ‘Red Flags’ That Might Mean It’s Time to Find a New Doctor

Another good one is an actor based video which discusses about the things people sometimes say (often clumsily) to patients that often don’t hit the right chord – check out my article “Things not to say to a someone with cancer“.

And of course we all look so well as Neuroendocrine Cancer patients – but you should see our insides.
Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Ronny Allan’s ‘PoNETry’ © – An Ode to Lanreotide


You may also enjoy my Invisible Illness ‘PoNETry’ – click here

Ronny Allan’s ‘PoNETry’ © series can be shared with poetry credit to:

RonnyAllan.NET and/or NET Cancer Blog

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Please flush after use!

I also found myself smiling at the fact that flushing is connected with the toilet and a type of red warm feeling in the upper torso – the two main symptoms of the Carcinoid Syndrome associated with the most common type of Neuroendocrine Cancer. “Please flush after use” – erm…yes sure but actually – no thanks

please-flush-after-use-350x225-polyIn the past couple of years, I’ve read so many stories about the quite natural act of using a toilet (…..some more repeatable than others).  I think if there was a ‘Bachelor of Science degree in Toiletry’, I might pass with First Class Honours.

I jest clearly but it’s strange that such a routine activity for most can actually become quite scientific in the world of Neuroendocrine Cancer and other ailments which might be described in some scenarios as invisible illnesses.

I also found myself smiling at the fact that flushing is connected with the toilet and a type of red warm feeling in the upper torso – the two main symptoms of the Carcinoid Syndrome associated with the most common type of Neuroendocrine Cancer.  “Please flush after use” – erm…yes sure but actually – no thanks 🙂

You're kidding me!
You’re kidding me!

When I read about some of the issues others deal with, I think I’m one of the luckier Neuroendocrine Cancer patients regarding these type of issues. I’m in reasonable condition considering the extent of my disease and my subsequent treatment.  I put up with a number of irritants but I don’t seem to suffer as much as some appear to do. That said, I think I sometimes downplay my own issues though, I’m well known for ‘not frightening the horses’.

One thing that does worry me is the occasional stomach cramp. Hopefully, I’m not tempting fate as they seem to be vastly reduced in the past 3 years. They can sometimes be very painful and debilitating – normally resolved by going to the toilet (and hopefully one is close!). Handy if I’m in the house, not so handy if I’m on a plane, in town or anywhere where toilets are not in abundance. I did write a blog on this subject following a very painful episode on my Hadrian’s Wall 6 day adventure – My stomach cramps my style’

As I’ve had intestinal surgery, Bowel obstructions are a potential worry. To date, pain and sluggishness have always been just a bout of constipation.  Read my article here.  You can carry a card for the bowel obstruction risk courtesy of NET Patient Foundation – these guys have a card for most stuff.

test npf

I don’t suffer from ‘carcinoid syndrome induced diarrhea’ but long flights are one of the few times I take Loperamide (Imodium).  For long drives and trips to town, I’m simply reliant on toilet availability. Normally, I just wander into hotels and restaurants and help myself. Sometimes I find only the disabled toilet is available and when it’s urgent I have no qualms about using it. Some of them are locked and you have to get a key – again I have no qualms about asking for access despite my outwardly healthy look – nobody has argued yet!  If sufficiently urgent, I’m even prepared to ask to use the staff toilets in shops etc. I do have a card in my wallet, which again, I obtained from my friends in the NET Patient Foundation.  I’ve not yet had to use it in anger. I also noticed that Macmillan are now doing something similar.

NPF Toilet Card Back

 

On the subject of urgent visits to the toilet.  I recently wrote a blog about a lady with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and I suspect in a worse condition than most Neuroendocrine Cancer patients.  She too looks outwardly healthy but this illness is clearly a major disability. I’d like to think this type of incident is not that common but her response to it was magnificent and it apparently went viral.  Just goes to show that with invisible illnesses Things are not always how they seem.  The letter is brilliant.

9540384-large

For those who are interested, NET Patient Foundation also do a Carcinoid Crisis at risk emergency card to keep in your wallet/purse so that doctors can be forewarned of the aversion to anaesthetics etc. Mine is in my wallet at all times just in case.

CARCINOID CRISIS NPF 2018 (2)

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Do you suffer from NET Brain?

This isn't me by the way!
This isn’t me by the way!

The acronym ‘NET‘ (NeuroEndocrine Tumour) can be advantageous to NET Cancer advocates and organisations because it occasionally attracts readership from outside the Cancer community when links are accidentally found by ‘surfers’ (intentional use of a word with a double meaning will become apparent …. read on).

You see, NET, just also happens to be a common truncation of the word ‘Internet‘ or ‘Network‘.  The vast majority will realise the irrelevance (to them) and move on but 1 or 2 might just hang around and take a look.  Bingo – we have spread a little bit of awareness!

However, these unintended awareness opportunities are not confined to ‘NET’.  According to my blog statistics, other than my name, the most common search phrase which leads to my blog is “No Fear” – the title of one of two blogs I wrote on so-called ‘scanxiety’.  However, I suspect many surfers, base jumpers, bungee jumpers, climbers, extreme sport types and those looking for this famous clothing brand, have now learned something about Neuroendocrine Cancer 🙂  Interestingly, there’s also been a search using the phrase “humor fat german nurse syringe to butt” which found my blog site. I wonder what that was about?

Conversely, NET (Cancer) advocates and patients may come across the term ‘NET’ thinking this is something associated with Neuroendocrine Tumours only to find it’s something about ‘technology’ – I know some NET patients who would be equally happy in both areas! Had he been alive, Steve Jobs (the most famous of all NET patients) would have been happy with this, most likely declaring his condition as ‘iNET‘. However, the diversion during searches is more likely to be in our direction given the extreme popularity of all things ‘NET’ in the IT world vs. the niche and esoteric subject of Neuroendocrine Tumours (NET).

This diversion happened to me last week when I came across an article in the UK news where the term ‘NET’ was used in conjunction with a part of the anatomy, so it immediately caught my eye.  It was a term I hadn’t heard before so thought it might be some new research worth ‘tweeting’ or for further analysis as a potential blog post. The article was entitled “Do you suffer from NET BRAIN?”. However, upon reading, I found it was news of research by a group of psychologists who claimed ‘tech’ (meaning IT/mobiles/tablets etc) makes one in 10 people into “anti-social and distracted narcissists” and that it was now a recognised medical disorder called NET BRAIN.

I laughed out loud (LOL), in fact, I also LMAO and was ROFL. Perhaps this was a reaction to disguise the feeling that I might already be suffering from this condition although I’m content it has nothing to do with my NET (are you confused yet?). Apparently the main symptoms of NET Brain are ‘poor attention span’ (PAS) and a ‘fear of missing out’ (FOMO) and personally I would also add the use of #dafthashtags and extreme use of three and four letter abbreviations (TLA and FLAS) into the mix.

What can I say … I don’t think I have PAS but I confess to sneakily checking twitter/emails/Facebook posts and my blog stats on a (shall we say) ‘frequent’ basis. I am, however, far too old for FOMO – I quite enjoy my 8 hours sleep a night (part of my new normal) and normally have no issues getting to sleep.  The article went on to say ‘people who are classed as passionate and uninhibited are three times more likely to become addicted to technology than others’. I’m passionate about stuff but I’m not that uninhibited (#tooconservative #annoyinglyanalytical).  IT and ‘social media’ (tech) are essential for my mission to spread awareness of NET Cancer – that rules out any narcissist tendencies. However, it does rule in what might be perceived as an addiction, but in reality I’m just a man on a mission.

One thing I did draw out of the article is that ‘NET Brain’ is definitely more prevalent and has a much higher incidence rate than NETs. However, if you actually suffer from FOMO, then you had better sign up for my blog, my daily twitter newsletter and Facebook immediately. I wouldn’t want you to miss anything 🙂

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Ronny Allan is an award winning patient leader and advocate for Neuroendocrine Cancer.

 

 

 

 

Colonoscopy Comedy

 

No more prep please!

Last year I wrote a series of blogs on the ‘coping’ side of cancer, one of which was about still being able to have a laugh. This was my way of saying no matter how tough life is, you need to stay positive and maintain your sense of humour. When I think back to some of the treatments I’ve had, I sometimes have a little laugh even although I wasn’t laughing at the time!  My favourite ‘treatment laugh’ is the ‘suppository story’ which occurred in hospital shortly after my first major surgery – it wasn’t funny at the time but I smile when I think back to it. On a similar subject, I had a colonoscopy around 21 months prior to my actual NET Cancer diagnosis.  Like the guy in the story below, I don’t remember a thing. However, what I do vividly remember (and clearly so did he!), is that the preparation for the procedure can be a ‘challenge’.  I can vouch for that.

I came across this real but anonymised journal which you may enjoy and hopefully have a little laugh too.  I suspect those who have had a colonoscopy (or two) will enjoy it more than others! I suddenly realised colonoscopies can be funny on the basis I laughed out loud reading this.  The quotes from doctors at the end are hilarious!

Colonoscopy Journal:

I called my friend Axxx, a gastroenterologist, to make an appointment for a colonoscopy. A few days later, in his office, Axxx showed me a color diagram of the colon, a lengthy organ that appears to go all over the place, at one point passing briefly through Minneapolis. Then Axxx explained the colonoscopy procedure to me in a thorough, reassuring and patient manner.  I nodded thoughtfully, but I didn’t really hear anything he said, because my brain was shrieking, ‘HE’S GOING TO STICK A TUBE 17,000 FEET UP YOUR BEHIND!’

I left Axxx’s office with some written instructions, and a prescription for a product called ‘MoviPrep,’ which comes in a box large enough to hold a microwave oven. I will discuss MoviPrep in detail later; for now suffice it to say that we must never allow it to fall into the hands of America’s enemies.

I spent the next several days productively sitting around being nervous.
Then, on the day before my colonoscopy, I began my preparation. In accordance with my instructions, I didn’t eat any solid food that day; all I had was chicken broth, which is basically water, only with less flavor. Then, in the evening, I took the MoviPrep. You mix two packets of powder together in a one-liter plastic jug, then you fill it with lukewarm water. (For those unfamiliar with the metric system, a liter is about 32 gallons). Then you have to drink the whole jug. This takes about an hour, because MoviPrep tastes – and here I am being kind – like a mixture of goat spit and urinal cleanser, with just a hint of lemon.

The instructions for MoviPrep, clearly written by somebody with a great sense of humor, state that after you drink it, ‘a loose, watery bowel movement may result.’ This is kind of like saying that after you jump off your roof, you may experience contact with the ground.  MoviPrep is a nuclear laxative. I don’t want to be too graphic, here, but, have you ever seen a space-shuttle launch? This is pretty much the MoviPrep experience, with you as the shuttle. There are times when you wish the commode had a seat belt. You spend several hours pretty much confined to the bathroom, spurting violently. You eliminate everything. And then, when you figure you must be totally empty, you have to drink another liter of MoviPrep, at which point, as far as I can tell, your bowels travel into the future and start eliminating food that you have not even eaten yet.

After an action-packed evening, I finally got to sleep. The next morning my wife drove me to the clinic. I was very nervous. Not only was I worried about the procedure, but I had been experiencing occasional return bouts of MoviPrep spurtage. I was thinking, ‘What if I spurt on Axxx?’ How do you apologize to a friend for something like that? Flowers would not be enough.

At the clinic I had to sign many forms acknowledging that I understood and totally agreed with whatever the heck the forms said. Then they led me to a room full of other colonoscopy people, where I went inside a little curtained space and took off my clothes and put on one of those hospital garments designed by sadist perverts, the kind that, when you put it on, makes you feel even more naked than when you are actually naked.

Then a nurse named Exxxx put a little needle in a vein in my left hand. Ordinarily I would have fainted, but Exxxx was very good, and I was already lying down. Exxxx also told me that some people put vodka in their MoviPrep. At first I was ticked off that I hadn’t thought of this, but then I pondered what would happen if you got yourself too tipsy to make it to the bathroom, so you were staggering around in full Fire Hose Mode. You would have no choice but to burn your house down. When everything was ready, Exxxx wheeled me into the procedure room, where Axxxx was waiting with a nurse and an anesthesiologist. I did not see the 17,000-foot tube, but I knew Axxx had it hidden around there somewhere. I was seriously nervous at this point. Axxxx had me roll over on my left side, and the anesthesiologist began hooking something up to the needle in my hand. There was music playing in the room, and I realized that the song was ‘Dancing Queen’ by ABBA. I remarked to Axxx that, of all the songs that could be playing during this particular procedure, ‘Dancing Queen’ had to be the least appropriate. ‘You want me to turn it up?’ said Axxx, from somewhere behind me. ‘Ha ha,’ I said. And then it was time, the moment I had been dreading for more than a decade. If you are squeamish, prepare yourself, because I am going to tell you, in explicit detail, exactly what it was like……………

I have no idea. Really. I slept through it. One moment, ABBA was yelling ‘Dancing Queen, feel the beat of the tambourine,’ and the next moment, I was back in the other room, waking up in a very mellow mood. Axxx was looking down at me and asking me how I felt. I felt excellent. I felt even more excellent when Axxx told me that It was all over, and that my colon had passed with flying colors. I have never been prouder of an internal organ.

On the subject of Colonoscopies……..

Colonoscopies are no joke, but these comments during the exam were quite humorous!!!!! A physician claimed that the following are actual comments made by his patients (predominately male) while he was performing their colonoscopies:

1. ‘Take it easy, Doc. You’re boldly going where no man has gone before!’
2. ‘Find Amelia Earhart yet?’
3. ‘Can you hear me NOW?’
4. ‘Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?’
5. ‘You know, in Arkansas, we’re now legally married.’
6. ‘Any sign of the trapped miners, Chief?’
7. ‘You put your left hand in, you take your left hand out…’
8. ‘Hey! Now I know how a Muppet feels!’
9. ‘If your hand doesn’t fit, you must quit!’
10. ‘Hey Doc, let me know if you find my dignity.’
11. ‘You used to be an executive at Enron, didn’t you?’

And the best one of all:

12. ‘Could you write a note for my wife saying that my head is not up there’

————————————————————————–

thanks for listening

Ronny

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Chocolate – the NET effect


fotolia_5369986_XS

I’ve always had a ‘sweet tooth’ and the softer the sweet the better – toffee, marshmallows, chocolate, jelly babies, jelly beans, fruit pastilles, fudge, liquorice allsorts and macaroon are all on my list of favourites.  In terms of desserts, I love those too – ice cream, cheese cake, meringue, cake, sponge with custard, the list is endless. And of course a hot drink isn’t complete without a biscuit (or three….). Don’t get me wrong, I’m not stuffing my face with sweet stuff 24/7, however I do need my sugar ‘fix’ now and then. I’m not a large person, I’m small ‘framed’ and although I was starting to look a bit ‘chubby’ early 2010, my Neuroendocrine Cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment took care of that.

Coping with cancer is hard and it can lead to certain lifestyle changes including diet. This is also hard! Coping with the amount of available and contradictory dietary information on cancer is challenging too!  There is also significant ‘chatter’ suggesting that sugar ‘fuels’ cancer cells.  Apparently there are more than one million websites capitalising on this fear but virtually none offering any science.  However, if you check reputable websites such as the main US and UK research agencies, you will see this link has not been scientifically proven and this claim is debunked on many reputable cancer websites in their lists of ‘cancer myths’.  Of course the situation is not helped by the wide circulation of these myths by the misinformed via social media – we’ve all seen these haven’t we?

I’m not saying that sugar is a good thing but like many other facets of modern lifestyle, too much of a good thing won’t be good for long.  The last thing any cancer patient wants is (yet) another debilitating or long-term chronic illness, something always in the back of my mind. I now watch what I eat although I try to keep a balance so that I can still enjoy some of my favourite foods – my food diary helps identify the ‘culprits’.  I had actually cut down on sugar before I was diagnosed, it’s addictive so it can be hard work!

So are sweets dangerous for a Neuroendocrine cancer patient? Like a lot of other things, in moderation they probably don’t do any harm but that’s based on my own experience. The amount of specific amines in foods can be a useful guide to how much you eat.  Please note not everyone has bad reactions and foods high in these amines do not fuel tumour growth!  Moreover, the only time you should really avoid these high amine foods is just prior to a 5HIAA test (unless you have a consistently bad reaction to them of course).  Chocolate is said to be “moderately high” in tyramine, dopamine, xanthenes and theobromine.  One size doesn’t fit all though and NET nutrition guides emphasise the amount will often matter more than the food itself. I will therefore continue to eat small amounts 😃 If you want to learn more about NET nutrition – read here.

I think sweeet stuff is more dangerous for those at risk of diabetes more than any potential syndrome effect.  Read more about Diabetes and NETs by clicking here.

Let me complete the blog with a recent personal incident regarding chocolate indicating there is a dark side to it (no pun intended!).  I cracked a tooth whilst eating a piece of chocolate in 2014.  I never found the broken piece so I assumed I’d swallowed it.  I kept a lookout for a few days but no sign and I presumed I just missed it.  However, 32 days later, my regular surveillance CT scan revealed an “ingested foreign body or ‘entrolith’ within a loop of the small bowel”.  A bit of a worry given the amount of surgery I’ve had.  My Consultant said it would eventually work its way out of the body naturally and it did.  Phew!

Apologies to anyone unable to eat any chocolate without an adverse reaction 😡

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Laughter is the best medicine

specticles

How many times have you heard it said that laughter is the best medicine?  I can certainly remember this phrase being said when I was a child.   There is some Science in Medicine (more applied than pure), so where is the scientific evidence for this claim?  Well after all this time, someone has decided to carry out a study.  Apparently when we laugh, we exercise our muscles, get blood flowing, decrease our blood pressure and stress hormones, improve sleep patterns and boost our immune system. It’s a new area of research known as ‘Psychoneuroimmunology’ – the study of how emotions affect our nervous and immune systems. It’s still a relatively new area of research, but the insights are promising.

The study looked at 20 healthy older adults in their 60s and 70s, measuring their stress levels and short-term memory. One group was asked to sit silently, not talking or reading and not using their mobile phones or tablet devices.  The other group watched funny video clips (personally I would have advised they watched the English football team 🙂 )

After 20 minutes, the participants gave saliva samples and took a short memory test. While both groups performed better after the break than before, the “laughter group” performed significantly better when it came to memory recall. Participants who viewed the funny videos had much higher improvement in recall abilities, 43.6 percent, compared with 20.3 percent in the “non-laughter” group.  The laughter group showed considerably lower levels of cortisol after watching the videos.  Cortisol is a key stress hormone measured via saliva.  The non-laughter group’s cortisol levels decreased just slightly.

Re the amusing picture, I received this in the form of a get well card after major surgery in 2010.  This person clearly understood my sense of humour and I hope you had a good laugh too. My surgeon’s secretary also thought it was funny and had her cortisol levels reduced 🙂  Laughter helps you feel both physically and emotionally healthy and could possibly be as good for you as taking a vitamin, who knows? Furthermore it’s prescription free!  More research is clearly still needed, but why not start to include laughter as part of your health regime?  Read my blog for starters 🙂

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Ronny Allan

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Dr Google will see you now

 

Searching your symptoms on the internet is

Whenever I need to know anything nowadays, I mostly just look on the internet and sometimes I ask my virtual PA ‘Alexa’ to look for me!  However, you need to be very careful in acceptance of what is credible information and what isn’t.

As a relatively experienced health blogger and activist, I like to think of myself as ‘internet savvy’, so I occasionally find myself using ‘Dr Google’ to diagnose my aches, pains and unusual feelings (and I confess to using it to help others).  I mostly find there are no real or definitive answers online for patient issues.  Although I seem to learn something on each piece of research, I also find some really worrying stuff.  Some symptoms can have dozens of reasons and I often realise how difficult it can often be for a doctor faced with unusual, vague and nonsensical symptoms!

On a recent online symptom check for lower left abdominal spasms, I discovered I was pregnant with an alien baby!  

The internet is really powerful but also really dangerous.  For example if you look up “best treatment for cancer”, you have an astonishing 300 million offerings. Right there with rigorous, evidence-based sites, there are those offering fermented foods and DIY cancer cure kits (e.g. fake healthcare news and cancer myths). Worried patients sometimes need help to distinguish between sensible advice and fanciful claims/ miracle cures.

When I combine my own experience with what I read on patient forums, I can see that internet searching is not for the faint of heart.  Some people are already in a state of anxiety before they started searching Dr Google’s archives, and what they find has probably made their anxiety worse.  In fact, the rise of the internet has created a new term for those who worry themselves sick and continually misdiagnose symptoms on the internet –  ‘Cyberchondriac’. 

However …..

Even when we know ‘googling’ our symptoms won’t end well, we don’t seem to care, we just need answers!  Searching authoritative sites is therefore really important and the availability of proper medical information online is actually putting more power in the hands of patients.  It’s how we as patients exploit it that is really important.  Just as you can find examples of ‘cyberchondria’ online, you can also find examples of patient power in a doctor’s office.  Worryingly, you can also find examples of ‘Dr Google’ being right after being dismissed by real doctors, sometimes resulting in patient illness or even death.  

The medical community need to accept that searching for more information is a natural patient instinct, not a slight against one’s doctor. The profession will have to get better at educating the next generation of doctors now that Dr Google is here to stay and, I think, to help. That said, I don’t believe the internet will ever replace the profound human dimension of the doctor-patient relationship. 

Google-doctor-mug-300x300

Tips for online searching:

1.  Don’t actually use internet search engines if you can help it, go to a reputable site and then search that. For NETs try RonnyAllan.NET

2.  Try to be specific as possible because vague search terms will result in frightening answers, and in practice any symptom can be read as a sign for nearly every single horrible illness, or a worsening or recurrence of an existing condition.

3. Less common conditions are less common, and minor symptoms often resolve themselves in time. If you have more worrying symptoms, or if your symptoms are changing or progressing, then go ‘offline’ i.e. visit your GP or primary care facility. If you’re sure of your facts, be assertive until you’re convinced otherwise. However, accept that the internet may be wrong when you seek medical help. 

5.  If you’re someone with an already diagnosed serious illness, the worry that goes with that is quite understandable – check out my 8 tips article.  However, the same tips apply although you may now have established your own specific sources of advice in addition the general health areas. 

6. Charities and associations for specific conditions are also a good information source but just note they may not have the best or up to date simply because they have been granted a ‘charity’ or equivalent status, so be careful, I’ve been some complete rubbish on these sites.  Patient forums can be ‘frighteningly good’ but they can also be ‘good at frightening’. Personally, I try not to compare myself to strangers on the internet.

I will not compare myself to strangers on the internet
Graphic courtesy of Emily McDowell

OK, the lead graphic is slightly ‘tongue in cheek’ but for those who are very anxious, it’s a reality. I can see from my own group that many Neuroendocrine Cancer patients have become very adept at searching online – useful because many still need a lot of help.

Be careful out there it’s dangerous.  I have a private group for patients and caregivers where I like to ‘keep it real’. Check it out here.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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patients included

Shrek and Princess Fiona

Shrek and Fiona
Shrek and Princess Fiona

I was looking through some old photographs and came across this one I thought you guys might like.  It’s pre-diagnosis, 2008 I think. As you can see, despite being an ogre, Shrek is actually quite a handsome chap 🙂 However, more to the point, Princess Fiona is as you would expect, beautiful and radiant. There’s a bit of a story behind this picture as Chris was in fact not very well at the time.

This picture was taken in Anaheim (LA) in Disneyland California in 2008. We were there with Chris’s brother Gerry (a mad ex paratrooper) and his lovely wife Babs.  Poor Chris developed a mild pneumonia on day 1 when we were in San Francisco having been a bit peaky on the plane. Despite a $600 antibiotic ‘shot’ in the ‘jacksie’, she spent the first couple of days in bed and was still not right when we drove from there to Yosemite; and then onto Death Valley and Vegas. She was actually starting to perk up by the time we got to LA but still looked weak and pale. Fortunately the photographer was able to put some colour in her cheeks and as you can also see, was able to put some flesh onto mine 🙂 Joking aside, looking at some of the other pictures from that period, I was certainly a bit ‘chubbier’ in the face than I am now (yes that is me on the left).

We’ve been back to USA 3 times since my diagnosis – can’t let cancer think it’s winning! 

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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