Clinical Trials – Surufatinib for Neuroendocrine Cancer (SANET)

Clinical Trials – Surufatinib for Neuroendocrine Cancer (SANET)

Clinical Trials
EDIT:  17 April 2020.  The FDA has granted Fast Track Designations to surufatinib for the treatment of advanced and progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and extra-pancreatic NETs in patients who are not amenable for surgery, according to Chi-Med, the developer of surufatinib I first heard about this drug at ENETS Barcelona 2017 and then again in 2018.  It's now starting to be discussed in USA including at the 2019 ASCO and more recently in the 2019 ESMO conference. It was known then as Sulfatinib but for reasons unclear to me it was changed later to Surufatinib. It's a novel, oral angio-immuno kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity (TKI) associated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), which both inhibit angiogenesis, and colony…
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Chemo or not Chemo – that is the question 

Chemo or not Chemo – that is the question 

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Treatment
I'm continually seeing certain drugs for treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumours (NETs) described as chemotherapy. I think there must be some confusion with more modern drugs which are more targeted and work in a different way to Chemotherapy. I researched several sites and they all tend to provide a summary of chemotherapy which is worded like this:  Chemotherapy means: a treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer medicines called cytotoxic drugs.  Cytotoxic medicines are poisonous (toxic) to cancer cells. They kill cancer cells or stop them from multiplying. Different cytotoxic medicines do this in different ways. However, they all tend to work by interfering with some aspect of how the cells divide and multiply. Two or more cytotoxic medicines are often used in a course of chemotherapy, each with a different way of working. This may give a better…
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