Neuroendocrine Cancer: No one gets it until they get it


Over the years of my advocating, I’ve tried to explain Neuroendocrine Cancer to many people outside the community.  Some ‘get it’ but many don’t.  Most understand ‘Cancer’, they have real difficultly understanding ‘Neuroendocrine‘.  Despite how hard I try, I can see that some of them just don’t get it!

One of the challenges of explaining Neuroendocrine Cancer is the sheer complexity and spectrum of types. It’s a heterogeneous grouping of cancers ranging from some quite indolent versions through to very aggressive versions similar to many dangerous adenocarcinomas.  Unlike many of the more understood cancers, Neuroendocrine Cancer can literally appear anywhere in the body, adding to an already complex description, in addition to creating a disadvantage of awareness opportunities – basically many doctors and media organisations don’t ‘get it’ either!

Add in the symptoms caused by Neuroendocrine Tumours and their associated ‘Syndromes‘ and ‘Hormones‘, the external audience is now falling asleep or lost interest. Trying to explain why these diseases cannot be diagnosed earlier is also very complex.  “How can it be so difficult” many of them ask.

If you have managed to keep their interest and get onto the subject of living with the disease, it gets even more mind-blowing.  Non-stop surveillance, lifetime surveillance, permanent side effects of treatment. “No way” many of them remark.  The problem is that many people have a really simple outlook on cancer; something goes wrong, you get diagnosed, you get treated, you either die or live.  Simple isn’t it?

One group that normally ‘gets it’ is those who have currently got it, i.e. Neuroendocrine Cancer patients and their close families and supporters.    They may not ‘get it’ before someone is diagnosed and they may still not ‘get it’ once someone is diagnosed, but they eventually will ‘get it’. I have many people who ‘get it’ in my private group and on my main campaign sites.

Despite the difficulties, I’ll continue talking to those who have not yet ‘got it’ hoping to make them understand the disease.  I also intend to continue to help with the undiagnosed (some of these guys probably do ‘get it’ but just not yet formally ‘got it’).  I also want to help those at and beyond diagnosis who despite having it, don’t yet quite ‘get it’.

No one gets it until they get it. It shouldn’t be that way. 

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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Neuroendocrine Cancer: a needle in a haystack


needle in a haystack

It’s no secret that Neuroendocrine Cancer can be difficult to diagnose. Although earlier diagnosis is improving (as reported in the SEER database report issued in 2017), there is still a lot of ground to cover. It’s also no secret that certain cancers are difficult to diagnose (NETs is one) and there are a number of reasons why this happens, including but not limited to: – they grow silently, they often produce vague symptoms which can be mistaken for much more common illnesses, and their complexity is not fully understood.

I wanted to cover two different aspects of the problem of finding NETs. Firstly, in finding the primary tumour so that the type of NET can be properly established – this drives the best treatment regime. Secondly in finding all the tumours, as this establishes the correct and most detailed staging declaration – this drives treatment plans and surveillance regimes that need to be put into place.

Hunting Tumours – Primary vs Secondary

It’s really important to determine which tumours are primary and which are secondary (metastasis). There’s a number of ways to help work this out and knowledge of NETs epidemiology studies can help.

Specialist Knowledge – certain things are known about the behaviour of NETs

Specialists and in particular NET specialists will be aware of the vagaries of NETs in terms of what tumours are normally a primary and which are normally secondary and many of the pitfalls involved in working that out. Many NETs will have metastasized to the liver at diagnosis, so whilst it is not impossible to have a primary liver NET, the vast majority of liver tumours found will be secondary (metastases). NET Specialists are more likely to have the experience than generalists. They know that the varying metastatic potential depending on the primary site clearly indicates differing biology and genetics across sites and they know that NETs are indeed a heterogeneous group of tumours. The differences cannot be explained by whether the NET is situated in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. For example, Appendiceal NET is known to be less prone to metastasis. This may be due to the high rate of incidental findings during appendectomies, or because the appendix is an immunological organ where malignant cells can therefore be expected to be frequently recognized by the immune system.

The majority of the digestive tract is drained by the portal venous system, explaining the dominance of liver metastases in this group of tumours. This also explains our finding that many nervous system and bone metastases originate from NETs in the lungs. Disseminated tumour cells may directly reach the systemic circulation from the lungs, whereas if originating from the midgut region, they need to first pass both the liver and the lungs.

As an example of this heuristic knowledge, one Swedish study indicated that two-thirds of peritoneal metastases will be attributed to Small Intestine NETs (SI NETs). SI NETs and Pancreatic NETs (pNETs) are the most likely to metastasize. The least likely sites to metastasize are the Appendix and Rectum. The same study indicated that in addition to the common metastatic locations of lymph nodes and liver, Lung NETs are more likely to metastasize to the brain and bone than other types. I believe the findings from this study more or less correlates to other information I’ve had access to and also confirms the technical behaviour paragraph above.

There are many other clues open to those involved in diagnosing a NET:

Patient. Very often the patient plays a big part of determining where the primary and other tumours might be by carefully describing symptoms.

Incidental Finds. NETs are very often found incidentally during trips to the ER/A&E and also during tests for something else. This is particularly the case with Appendiceal NETs and might explain why the average age of a patient is significantly lower in this type of NET.

Blood tests and Hormone Markers. We are not yet in a position where these types of tests can diagnose (but we are moving in that direction). In the case of unknown primaries (CUP), sometimes test results can help to find where some of these cancers started. With NETs, symptomatic patients can often test to confirm an elevated hormone marker which may narrow it down to a specific organ or gland. Read more here.

Scans and Endoscopies. Most cancers of a certain size may show up on conventional scanning such as CT, MRI and Ultrasound. Nuclear scans are now playing a bigger part in finding tumours which betray their location through functional behaviour by lighting up or glowing on these imaging devices. Endoscopies (e.g. gastroscopies, colonoscopies, even gastro intestinal pill cameras can be used) can help but like scans are not foolproof). Generally with NETs, if you can see it, you can detect it. Read more here.

Hereditary Conditions. Around 5-10% of NETs are hereditary in nature, mostly involving the MEN group of syndromes. Many of those people will know they are at risk of developing NETs and their doctors should know the most common locations for primary tumours associated with each gene. So a declared or suspected hereditary syndrome is useful in finding primary tumours if they exist and are proving difficult to find.

Biopsies. “Tissue is the issue”. Pathology can very often give really strong clues as to the type of NET and therefore the likely location of a primary tumour, for example additional tests such as immunostains. Many biopsies will come from secondary cancer (metastases), mostly the liver.  Despite all the potential diagnostic routes above, the place the cancer started is sometimes still not found and this may lead to atypical diagnostic/treatment plans and in certain cases this might even include exploratory biopsies via surgery (invasive/minimally invasive), perhaps combined with opportunistic tumour removal if found during the procedure.

Staging. Simple staging can be given if locations of metastases are known. For example in the case of Liver metastases, the stage is automatically Stage 4. However, the full staging definition relies on knowing distant metastases, loco-regional metastases and the full Tumour/Node/Metastases (TNM) definition (size, spread, etc) cannot be given without a primary. Read more here.

Cancers of Unknown Primary

Cancer is always named for the place where it started, called the primary site. Sometimes doctors can’t tell where a cancer may have started. When cancer is found in one or more places where it seems to have spread, but the site where it started is not known, it is called a cancer of unknown primary (CUP) or an occult primary cancer.

When you look at the ratio of all cancers, the figure for cancers of unknown primary (CUP) is quite startling. Depending on where you look the figure is around 2-10%. That doesn’t seem a lot but when you consider the amount of people diagnosed with cancer, the total figure must be staggering. Interestingly, Cancer Research UK say that 60% of CUP cases are in the over 75s. In another interesting Swedish study, doctors claimed that the rates of metastatic cases were higher with certain NETs than they were in their anatomical counterparts, reinforcing the dangerous and sneaky nature of NETs.

Despite quite advanced scanning and diagnostic testing currently in place, and the extensive knowledge of NET specialists, there can still be reasons for not being able to find the primary tumour:

  • The primary is just too small to be seen and is growing quite slow. Very small cancers might not cause symptoms or be seen on scans. This is a particularly relevant point with NETs.
  • The primary could be hidden in tissue in between different organs causing confusion about the actual primary location.
  • The body’s immune system killed the primary cancer. It’s also possible (but not common) that any secondary cancer (i.e. metastases) is still growing.
  • The tumour has become loose from its primary location and exited the body, e.g. from a wall of the bowel and excreted out in the stool.
  • The primary cancer was removed during surgery for another condition and doctors didn’t know cancer had formed. For example, a uterus with cancer may be removed during a hysterectomy to treat a serious infection.

Summary

I hope this is useful for many NET patients, particularly those who are looking for a diagnosis or looking for a primary tumour.

Neuroendocrine Cancer – at times, it can really be like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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Neuroendocrine Cancer: A Witch’s Brew of Signs and Symptoms


cancer growth

One of the key awareness messages for Neuroendocrine Cancer is the hormonal syndromes that can often accompany the diagnosis for many people.  As it’s a difficult disease to diagnose, many people struggle with these syndromes for some time before formal diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Cancer. Some continue to struggle after.

The cancer can often be uncannily quiet, but the tumours can be ‘functional’ and over-secrete certain hormones to add or introduce symptoms which mimic many other diseases or conditions, such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Menopause, Heart disease and Asthma.   In addition to common symptoms of flushing and diarrhea, others include generally feeling weak, fatigued, pain, agitated, anxious, dizzy, nauseous, acid reflux, skin irritation, anaemic, lose weight, gain weight, low blood sugar, high blood sugar, heart palpitations, headaches, sweating, high blood pressure. Its main trick is to prevent you from being correctly diagnosed and it’s pretty good at it.  For those looking for a diagnosis, it can be very frightening.

One or more of the NET syndromes can be a weird concoction of strange, powerful or terrifying ingredients, designed to make you very ill; and doctors will be confused. 

Certain types of Neuroendocrine Cancer were once referred to by the out of date term of ‘Carcinoid‘ – now correctly referred to as a NET prefixed by its anatomical primary location. For the time being, the term Carcinoid Syndrome associated with these types of NET persists and this is known to be capable of over secreting (amongst others) the vasoactive substance called serotonin. It is commonly thought that serotonin is the cause of the flushing, but this is only partially correct, the flushing also results from secretion of kallikrein, the enzyme that catalyzes a conversion to bradykinin, one of the most powerful vasodilators known.  Other components of the carcinoid syndrome are diarrhea, probably caused by the increased serotonin, which greatly increases peristalsis, leaving less time for fluid absorption, a pellagra-like syndrome, probably caused by diversion of large amounts of tryptophan from synthesis of the vitamin B3 (Niacin), which is needed for NAD production (oxidized form of B3). It also causes fibrotic lesions of the endocardium, particularly on the right side of the heart resulting in insufficiency of the tricuspid valve and, less frequently, the pulmonary valve and, uncommonly, bronchoconstriction. Other fibrosis spells include mesenteric and retroperitoneal desmoplasia which have the potential to dangerously obstruct important vessels and cause general discomfort at best.

 

serotonin

 

Carcinoid Syndrome is one of the most powerful and dangerous ‘witch’s brews’. 

The classic carcinoid syndrome includes flushing (80%), diarrhea (70%), abdominal pain (40%), valvular heart disease (40% to 45% but reduced to 20% since the introduction of somatostatin analogues), telangiectasia (25%), wheezing (15%), and pellagra-like skin lesions (5%). Carcinoid syndrome, first described in 1954 by Thorson and co-workers, has the following features: malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the small intestine, normally with metastases to the liver, sometimes with valvular disease of the right side of the heart (pulmonary stenosis and tricuspid insufficiency without septal defects), peripheral vasomotor symptoms, bronchial constriction, and an unusual type of cyanosis. One year later, Dr. William Bean gave the following colorful description of carcinoid syndrome:

“This witch’s brew of unlikely signs and symptoms, intriguing to the most fastidious connoisseur of clinical esoterica—the skin underwent rapid and extreme changes resembling in clinical miniature the fecal phantasmagoria of the aurora borealis.” 

Other witch’s brews include the group of NET syndromes associated with over-secretions of Insulin, Glucagon, Gastrin, Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP) and Somatostatin.  Read more about these and other syndromes here.

NET Syndromes

One of the most scary witch’s brews is the group of symptoms associated with one of the most uncommon types of NET, the catecholamine and metanephrine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) secreting tumours known as Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma. These tumours are likely to cause a barrage of symptoms such as High blood pressure, Heavy sweating, Headache, Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia), Tremors, Paleness in the face (pallor) and Shortness of breath (dyspnea).

spotlight on pheo para

All of the above is a diagnostic nightmare for those who have the symptoms and remain undiagnosed – no fun for the doctors either – this why we need so much more awareness and education – it’s one of the key aims of all my social media sites.  Another aim of my sites is to support those who are diagnosed as these symptoms can continue following diagnosis and treatment. Many NET patients need constant surveillance and follow-up, many for life.

This is a very spooky disease, it will slowly grow without you knowing, it will mess with your body and mind, and if left alone to plot its devious and destructive course, it will kill.  Some are faster growing but they have the same traits – they just kill faster.  Share this post and potentially save a life.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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My Diagnosis and Treatment History

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

Ronny Allan is an award winning patient leader and advocate for Neuroendocrine Cancer.

 

 

 

Diagnosing the Undiagnosed


Neuroendocrine Cancer is one of a number of “difficult to diagnose” conditions. Many types of Neuroendocrine Cancer come with an associated syndrome and these syndromes can mimic everyday illnesses. In some cases, many people don’t feel ill while the tumours grow. Most types of this cancer are slow-growing but there are also aggressive versions. Although things appear to be improving in diagnostic terms, it can sometimes take years for someone to be finally diagnosed correctly and get treatment, albeit in some cases, too late for any hope of a curative scenario. It’s a very sneaky type of cancer and if left too long it can be life threatening – CLICK HERE to find out why.

The road to a diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Cancer is often not straight or easy to navigate. It’s not only a sneaky type of cancer but it’s also very complex. It’s a heterogeneous group of malignancies with a varied and confusing histology and nomenclature to match. As I said above, many people are asymptomatic for years whilst the tumor grows and some might say that it’s somewhat ‘lucky’ to have symptoms to help aid a diagnosis. Many find that a lack of knowledge of Neuroendocrine Cancer in primary care, doesn’t always produce results. Common misdiagnoses include (but not limited to), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and other common digestive diseases, menopause, appendicitis, hypertension, gastritis, asthma. Neuroendocrine Cancer is much more likely to be diagnosed at secondary care if a referral for ‘something’ can be achieved.

……..cue internet searches (Dr Google)

I think the rise and the power of the internet and rise of social media applications is very much helping generate awareness and knowledge of Neuroendocrine Cancer and those looking for a diagnosis may find help in this way. I suspect this instant access to information has played its part in the diagnostic improvements I mentioned above. Take my own efforts for example, I’m a wee Scottish guy with a computer and I’m already accelerating towards a million blog views – there’s clearly a market for what I produce. In terms of those looking for a diagnosis, if only one gets an earlier diagnosis due to my site, I’ll be happy.

Unfortunately, the internet can often be a minefield and in many cases, can lead to quite unnecessary worry for those looking for a solution.

Incoming Questions

I’m contacted almost daily by the ‘undiagnosed’ who suspect they have Neuroendocrine Cancer, often because they appear to be displaying the symptoms of one of the associated syndromes. These are some of my most difficult questions. I’m always very wary of initially agreeing with their assumptions and logic, instead opting for straightforward detective work based on my knowledge of the different types of Neuroendocrine Cancer, knowledge of the best scans, tumour markers, hormone markers. And I always warn them that statistically, they are more likely to have a common condition than the less common Neuroendocrine Cancer.

Many have already had multiple doctor’s appointments and tests. If they have not yet had a scan, I encourage them to try to get one ‘by hook or by crook’. Despite what you read on patient forums and surveys, the vast majority of Neuroendocrine diagnoses will be triggered by a conventional imaging such as CT and/or MRI. If you can see it, you can detect it. 

When I first chat with the ‘undiagnosed’, I find many of them are fairly knowledgeable about Neuroendocrine Cancer and other health conditions, again confirming the power of the internet and the savvy ‘internet patient’. This is fine if you look in the right places of course – for certain things there are more wrong places on the internet than right ones.

If I have time, I’m happy to chat with these people, some are very frustrated – in fact some are so frustrated that they just want a diagnosis of something even if that something is really bad.  Some are not showing anything on any scan but in certain cases, it can be likened to finding a needle in a haystack.

What do you say to someone who is utterly convinced they have Neuroendocrine Cancer but CT/MRI/Octreoscan/Ga68 PET are all clear, Chromogranin A and 5HIAA are in range but they still say they have (say) diarrhea with its potential for literally thousands of differential diagnoses. It’s a tough gig.

Example:

My scan came back normal. That should be good news. But, if there is no tumor, how can I be suffering from all the symptoms of carcinoid syndrome? Is that diagnosis wrong? Are the urine and blood test results wrong? I’m awaiting a MRI scan to take another look to see if the doctor can find anything. I don’t know what they’ll find. I don’t want them to find anything. But I’m afraid of what will happen if they don’t.

Anon

Patient Forums

I always let the undiagnosed know that Neuroendocrine Cancer patients are some of the most friendliest and helpful people you can meet, they will treat you as one of their own. There will be a number of diagnosed people online who have gone through what the undiagnosed are going through, so they will both sympathise and emphasise. But … this can often have the adverse effect of pushing them into believing they must have Neuroendocrine Cancer. This makes for interesting discussions given the number of people who automatically assume that ‘flushing’ or ‘diarrhea’ (as described by the undiagnosed) must be Neuroendocrine Cancer without any reference to the many differential diagnoses and the context of what that actually means in Neuroendocrine Cancer terms.

10 Questions to ask your doctor/specialist for those Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer (and where to find a specialist)

I once wrote an article for DIAGNOSED NET Patients suggesting 10 Questions to ask their doctor. So I wanted to take a step back in context, using the knowledge I now have, and put myself in the shoes of someone who thinks they may have Neuroendocrine Cancer but is not yet diagnosed.

Key questions to ask your doctor/specialist for those trying to confirm or discount Neuroendocrine Cancer

Dear undiagnosed people. I totally understand your fear. There’s nothing worse than being ill and not knowing what illness you have. I’ve therefore compiled a list of 3 key questions for you to ask – think of it as a tick list of things to ask your doctor to do or check . I have linked several background articles for you to prepare your case. However, I cannot promise your doctor will agree or take any action, in fact some might be annoyed about the lack of trust. However, doing your homework really helps, including diaries and other evidence.

I also wouldn’t say that a negative to all the questions will mean you definitely do not have Neuroendocrine Cancer but at least these questions might provide your doctor and yourself with some food for thought, perhaps leading to the diagnosis of ‘something’. The questions below assume that routine blood tests have been done, including Full Blood Count, Liver, Renal, Bone, Glucose.

Questions for the UNDIAGNOSED to ask their treating physician

“I think I might have a type of cancer known as Neuroendocrine Cancer or Neuroendocrine Tumours (NET) because <<< insert your own story>>>. Would you please consider the following tests and checks:”

1. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a marker which is quite sensitive for Neuroendocrine Tumours, essentially measuring tumour bulk potentially indicating the presence of Neuroendocrine Tumours. There can be other reasons for an elevated CgA figure, including the patient’s use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) (see the article for an alterative test where this is the case). Read more here – Neuroendocrine Cancer – Tumour and Hormone Marker tests.

2. 5HIAA is a hormone marker for the most common type of NET, particularly if the patient is presenting with flushing and diarrhea. Many NETs have associated syndromes and hormone markers can be a guide to help with diagnostics. Read more about 5HIAA and other hormone markers for different types of NET and different syndromes here Neuroendocrine Cancer – Tumour and Hormone Marker tests.

3. Scans. Most NETs can be seen on a CT scan although liver metastasis can often show more clearly on an MRI. There are also nuclear scan options to confirm conventional imaging findings. Some NETs may be accessible via endoscopy and ultrasounds can also give hints for further investigation. In some cases, nuclear scans will find things that conventional imaging cannot because radionuclides can normally pick up oversecreting tumours. Read more in my article “If you can see it, you can detect it”.

You can hear two NET specialists talking about the issues surrounding the diagnostics here.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

patients included

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Sapanisertib – a drug on trial for Neuroendocrine Tumors (NET) with a pancreatic primary


Researchers are testing the drug Sapanisertib to see if it can halt the progression of pancreatic NETs (pNETs) which cannot be surgically removed, have not responded to other treatment, and have spread to other parts of the body.

What is Sapanisertib?

Sapanisertib is one of a group of targeted therapy drugs that interferes with tumor progression by inhibiting an enzyme known as mTOR which a tumor cell needs for growth.  In fact this is the same technique used in Afinitor (Everolimus), already approved for NETs.

It is also being tested in a number of different advanced cancers, including bladder, kidney, breast, liver, and certain types of lung cancers, among others.

The Clinical Trial

The primary goal of the phase II study is to evaluate how well pNET tumors respond to Sapanisertib. To qualify for this trial patients must have advanced pNET that cannot be surgically removed, and which have not responded to previous treatment with similar drugs. All participants will receive Sapanisertib, and will be checked periodically to see if their tumors are responding to the drug.

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided at this link which provides more details about the Sapanisertib pNET trial – click here and check the inclusion and exclusion criteria; and other data.  There are 354 study locations across the USA.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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My Diagnosis and Treatment History

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – HALF A MILLION views

I am totally astonished to have been able to accumulate 500,000 (half a million) views of my blog. When I first set it up in Apr 2014, it was just to help spread awareness whilst I was walking the 84 miles of Hadrian’s Wall with my wife Chris. I never for thought for one minute I would still be doing it today and accumulate over 11,000 followers across all my social media sites, from all over the world.

Can’t stop, won’t stop. Onwards to 1 million views for Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness.

My key aims are international level awareness, advocacy, campaigning, and support for NET patients via all my social media accounts. I realise I’m not your regular NET advocate and I do things differently. However, I’m fairly certain that has played a part in getting to this stage.

My main sites are here:

Blog – ronnyallan.NET – 500,000 blog views as at 7 March 2018. Click here.

Twitter – @ronnyallan1 and @netcancerblog

Facebook – I have numerous accounts:

NET Cancer Blog (my main site with around 6000 as at March 2018) – click here and ‘Like’
Ronny Allan – additional output – click here and ‘Like’

Newsletter – extending the reach into wider areas via a daily newsletter from twitter and other sources. click here to subscribe.

Instagram – click here to follow

Many of you who read this will already be on these sites so please ‘Follow’ or ‘Like’ as appropriate – be careful you don’t ‘Unfollow’ or ‘Unlike’.

There are so many other sources of routes into my blog and I’m grateful to the many patient advocate organisations, patient advocates, the healthcare community in general and many, many, more. If you’re reading this, thank you so much.

Please note:
All information provided on this Facebook page or any of my social media accounts does not constitute professional medical advice. See my disclaimer here: DISCLAIMER

Message me here: http://m.me/NETCancerBlog

I also have a private Facebook group, let me know if you’re interested.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Read my Cure Magazine contributions

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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Things to do today

When you live with any illness, getting through the day can be tough. Trying to get a diagnosis, dealing with a diagnosis, undergoing treatment and then learning to recover and adapt.

I’ve been living with my condition for almost 8 years and I’m a big advocate of keeping busy, keeping active and keeping my mind occupied. Despite this, there are times with a chronic disease, an invisible disease, an incurable and long-term disease including cancer, occasionally just doing nothing can be very productive in the long term!

Of course, sometimes you have little choice if you’re ill from your condition or something routine.

So now and then, I just breathe in and breathe out (then repeat). It’s very enjoyable!

Take a break if you need one.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Read my Cure Magazine contributions

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

 

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RonnyAllan.NET – Community Newsletter January 2018

A great start to the year in both NETs in the news and my social media activity.  Of course the headline is the US FDA approval of Lutathera (Lu-177) – i.e. PRRT

I caught this news in my social media NET

  1. FDA finally approves PRRT in USA. Long awaited and has caused much excitement on all forms of social media. I’m very pleased for my USA friends but we mustn’t forget it’s also required in so many other places.  Help me populate locations in my live article on  PRRT click here.
  2. NET Epidemiology continues to be discussed and (yet) another well known NET expert confirms my 2 year old article saying that the  disease can no longer be considered rare. I suspect more dominoes will follow. Click here for the evidence.
  3. MIDATECH Pharma announced intention to carry out human trials of Q-Octreotide – check out my article covering this potential new drug.  Click here

Blog Site Activity  

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these articles created or majorly updated in Jan 2018 may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs. You can actually sign up to receive my blog articles direct to your inbox when published – subscribe here.

  I now take food with my medicine!  A light-hearted discussion about taking pills/capsules as a NET patient
  Shame on you! An invisible illness article based on a true story.  Some people can be cruel.
  PERT (Creon etc).  Who needs it and why.
PRRT – The Sequel? – Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT)  The future of PRRT type treatment?
  My December 2017 Newsletter in case you missed it.

January 2018 was a record breaking month since blog inception.  Here are the top 10 most read articles which contributed to Jan’s figures:

Shame on you! More stats 2,064
Neuroendocrine Cancer – no treats, just tricks More stats 1,488
Lutetium Lu 177 dotatate (Lutathera®) – PRRT More stats 1,226
PRRT – The Sequel? – Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) More stats 1,101
Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – Home Page More stats 1,053
Neuroendocrine Cancer and Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (PERT) –
the Digested Version (Nutrition Series Article 5)
More stats 899
Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – Grade and Stage (incorporating WHO 2017 changes) More stats 855
“You must be doing OK, you’ve not had chemotherapy” More stats 819
Background to my Diagnosis and Treatment More stats 594
Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer? – 10 questions to ask your doctor More stats 36

Other Activity

I’m constantly looking for opportunities to spread awareness and advance the cause of Neuroendocrine Cancer patients.  Thank you all so much for the support in helping me do this.

  • Please join my 2018 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

  • I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer
  • Please also note that due to sheer numbers of requests, I cannot accept telephone or video calls on a one to one basis. Please just message me and I will respond – see “Send Message” button when you CLICK HERE. (also please ‘Like’ this page if you have not already done so).
  • The number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.
  • As the number of people contacting me has increased so much, I’ve set up a chat room here (I’m not the only one who can answer questions!).  This is not a forum, it’s a place to make people feel safe and to discuss.  I welcome all types of NET, people from any country and I also welcome carers/caregivers and medical people. It’s also a place where I will bring in expertise to chat about various issues.  The first online chat will be about PERT (Creon etc) – date to be confirmed by probably around end of Feb).  Join by clicking here (please answer the 3 simple questions)

New Audiences for NET Cancer

From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETs rather than just share stuff within our own community. I’m doing this although it may not always be apparent.  For example. my story is featured on World Cancer Day – click here.  Please join my World Cancer Day calendar event to be reminded each year – click here and select ‘Going’.

  • Article features.
    • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more. In October, I was featured in Cure Magazine twice.  I have been so busy in 2017 but I have plans to increase my presence there in 2018:
“Cancer isn’t all about me”
“Poker Face or Cancer Card”
  • Twitter. I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of research stuff there, in addition to new audiences. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  There are people regularly retweeting my stuff who do not have a personal interest in NETs. In Jan, I tweeted 187 times on my personal account which led to over 145,000 views.  I was mentioned 101 times by other tweeters, 3003 people looked at my profile and I gained 67 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.
  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. This has been a huge success from my point of view and I’ve had a growth spurt in January. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.

  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences in addition to enriching my experience as a Patient Leader.  WEGO is a fantastic organisation!

WEGO Awards

Speaking Engagements

I’ve been invited to speak to a local (ish) NET patient support group, just tying up the details (watch this space).

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  At the end of January, I accelerated past 470,000 blog views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing!  On track for half a million by end of February.

Facebook Milestone.  I have my eyes set on 6000 followers by the end of March, could be sooner with your direct involvement!  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested. There are buttons to share the page and invite others to ‘Like’ it.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (go to these pages and click on ‘Like’)

These are fallback  sites to counter the Facebook algorithm whereby you may not see all my posts on the main site (click on the links to see the pages)

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 250 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  I really enjoy these pictures, I hope you do too. You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

An amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments and private messages give me inspiration or at least a chance to explain further – and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in January.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

I now take food with my medicine!


vitamin-supplements_650x450-002

If you want to strike up a friendly conversion with a Brit, ask him or her about the weather – we’re really famous for our weather conversations and they normally focus on rain or clouds!  However, despite the famous British ‘reserve’ and ‘stiff upper lip’, they also frequently talk about being ‘under the weather’, a phrase meaning slightly unwell or in low spirits.

I find myself smiling at some of the conversations I hear in medical establishment waiting rooms, particularly the potentially long wait for blood tests.  Here, conversations bypass the weather and focus on being under the weather! I thought I was a regular when I started to recognise people in the queue (line!) and their pill conversations.  Statements such as “Yes, I just started a ‘blue chap’ ” (medical names are sometimes hard to pronounce).  Normally followed by “I’m on that one too and I take it along with my yellow and white chaps“.  Some people seem to be taking a veritable rainbow of ‘chaps’.  Strangely, some people appear to be quite proud of how many ‘chaps’ they take. I tend to maintain the traditional British reserve and a stiff upper lip in waiting rooms, so I keep quiet (actually I’m just happy to be inside away from the weather!).

I might join in one day and I wonder if they would be impressed with my tally of chaps? I have a funny feeling my tally of drugs is nothing compared to some of you guys and hope you will comment to prove me right! I don’t think I’m proud to give you my list but here’s my ‘chaps’, some prescription, some over the counter:

  • Apixaban (Eliquis).  To prevent a recurrence of pulmonary emboli (PE). Unfortunately, I had PE after my big surgery in 2010. 2 per day.
  • Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (Creon).  Recently added, anything between 6 and 12 per day depending on what I eat.  Check out this article on PERT.  Check out this article on Malabsorption with references to NET dietitians.
  • Multi-Vitamin (50+ age).  I’ve actually been taking these since a few years before diagnosis in 2010.  NET patients can be at risk of vitamin and mineral deficiencies.  Check out this article on the issues and with references to NET dietitians.
  • Vitamin B Complex. This was added in 2013 to mainly tackle low B12 (despite my multi-vit containing 400% RDA) and it seemed to help with fatigue.  Read more here.
  • Vitamin D3. This was also added in 2013 to tackle low Vit D levels (again, despite my multi-vit containing 200% RDA). 10µg (400iu).  D3 is normally the recommended form of Vitamin D to take, easiest to absorb and more natural.  Vitamin D3 is also known as cholecalciferol.  Many people who do not live in sunny countries are probably deficient or borderline already.
  • Probiotic.  This was also added in 2013 to try to offset some of the abdominal issues that many NET patients seem to have.  I take a 5 billion dose and it seems to help.  Check out this article with references to NET dietitians.
  • Omega 3.  This is also something I had been taking since before my diagnosis.  I think I took it for a couple of reasons, my diet did not really include foodstuffs containing Omega 3 and I was experiencing some joint pain in my hands.  I just never stopped taking it.  Dose size 1000mg.
  • Lanreotide (Somatuline Autogel).  An injection rather than a pill/capsule.  Quite a big chap!  You can read all about my relationship with Lanreotide by clicking here.
  • Levothyroxine. One 50mcg tablet each morning.  My blood tests are indicating hypothyroidism – check out my whole thyroid story by clicking here.  All NET patients need to keep an eye on thyroid levels.  Read why here.
  • Seretide and Ventolin.  These are asthma drugs, a preventer and a reliever respectively.  I hardly ever take the latter nowadays.  I had mild asthma as a child, it went at 16 and came back at 35.  I take 2 puffs of Seretide night and day.  Seems to help.  Ventolin seems to be only required if I have a cold or flu thing going on.

Of course, most people have lots of other stuff in the ‘medicine box’ ready for ad hoc issues as they arise (pain killers, imodium, cough mixture, anti-histamines, indigestion, etc etc).   I could go on forever.

Please always consult your specialists or dietitian about the requirements for drugs and supplements.  You may not actually need them.  I only take my supplements after very careful consideration, in reaction to low blood vitamin/mineral tests and listening to what ‘NET aware’ dietitians say (you’ll find references in some of the articles above).

Warning:  You should always think carefully about over the counter stuff (including online) as there’s a lot of ‘scammers’ out there selling counterfeit supplements.  Always buy from a reputable source.  With supplements, remember in most countries they are not regulated in the same way as medicines so it’s worthwhile checking they are compliant with regional food supplements directives.  The supplements provider I use is actually approved by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) covering UK.  I’m sure there will be similar approval organisations where you live.  Also be careful of some claims about the miracle cure of certain food supplements.  There are plenty sites with fake health news online (check out my article on this – click here).

You should be clear why you take supplements and try to consult with a specialist or dietitian for advice.

Finally, don’t forget to take your chaps, they should help you keep well!

PRRT – The Sequel? – Clinical trial of Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) –  212 Pb-AR-RMX

Radioimmunotherapy

In 2018, RadioMedix Inc. and Areva (parent company Orano Med) initiated the Phase 1 trial for AlphaMedixTM in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positive Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) – an NIH supported trial.

AlphaMedixTM is composed of a somatostatin analogue radiolabeled with 212Pb, an isotope used for Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT).  This open-label, dose escalation study’s objective is to determine safety, bio-distribution, and preliminary effectiveness of 212 Pb-AR-RMX in adult patients with differentiated (sic) NETs. “Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy (TAT) is the wave of the future in nuclear oncology and has a tremendous potential to treat patients with NET and overcome some of the limitations of current Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT)” said Dr. Ebrahim S. Delpassand, Chairman and CEO of RadioMedix, sponsor of the trial. They further announced on 21 Feb 2018 that the first patients had undergone some treatment.

The funding for Phase 2 was granted by NIH on 22 Jan 2019.

What is Targeted Alpha-emitter Therapy?  Targeted Alpha Therapy is based on the coupling of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes to tumour selective carrier molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or peptides. These molecules have the ability to selectively target tumour cells even if they are spread throughout the body. They recognize the targeted cancer cells through antigens that are expressed on the cell surface and can bind selectively to these cells, similar a key fitting into a lock. In targeted alpha therapy these carrier molecules serve as vehicles to transport the radioisotopes to the cancer cells. This is called the “magic bullet” approach. Radioisotopes that emit alpha particles seem particularly promising to selectively destroy cancer cells. Alpha particles have a high energy in the range of 5-9 MeV and at the same time a very short path length in human tissue below 0.1 mm, corresponding to less than 10 cell diameters. Consequently, the use of alpha emitters allows the specific targeting and killing of individual malignant cells, while minimizing the toxicity to surrounding healthy tissue. Extracted from EU Science Hub

According to the clinical trials document, this drug addresses an unmet need in the field of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for NETs. Substitution of an alpha emitter (²¹²Pb) for the beta emitters currently being used (i.e., 177Lu or 90Y) will provide significantly higher Linear Energy Transfer (LET) and a shorter path length. Higher LET particles should cause more tumor cell death. Shorter path length should result in less collateral damage of the normal tissue and therefore less side effects for subjects receiving the drug.

What is the difference between PRRT and TAT?  From the scant ‘patient understandable‘ information currently available, it would appear that TAT has the potential to be more targeted and less toxic than PRRT – to me that seems like it would be able to target smaller tumors.  I also noted that TAT is sometimes described as a ‘radioimmuotherapy’ or ‘alpha immunotherpy’, indicating the mechanism of action is significantly different to that of conventional PRRT. It was also described as a ‘Trojan Horse’ which would seem to hint at its immunotherapy credentials.

I noted that TAT is also being studied for use in Prostate Cancer and Leukaemia.

Related articles:

Announcement of Phase 1 Clinical Trial – click here – results to follow.

Funding grant from NIH for Phase 2 – click here

Phase 1 Clinical Trial Document Phase 1 Study of AlphaMedix™ in Adult Subjects With SSTR (+) NET – click here – Phase 2 document to follow.

Areva Med Website – click here

RadioMedix Inc Website – click here

You may also enjoy my articles:

Lutetium Lu 177 dotatate (Lutathera®) – PRRT” – click here.
Expanding PRRT – Trial of 177Lu-Edotreotide (Solucin®) – COMPETE Trial” – click here.
Theranostics – a find and destroy mission” – click here
Ga68 PET Scans – into the unknown” – click here

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

patients included

Please Share this post:

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter DECEMBER 2017

6

HAPPY NEW YEAR and welcome to Ronny Allan’s Community newsletter for December 2017. A quieter month due to the holiday season in the latter half.  I was generally quieter in the first half too, maybe that’s a good thing? Nonetheless, I still managed to accumulate nearly 20,000 hits this month.

At the end of 2017, I’ve been reflecting on the amazing support from you guys.  I’m a bit ‘discombobulated’ but also proud to see that I’ve had an amazing quarter of a million hits on my blog site in 2017 alone, double the 2016 figure.  It seems almost impossible to carry that momentum on in 2018 but I’ll give it a go!  Check out my top 6 posts of 2017 by clicking here.

AND ….. I’m now officially ronnyallan.NET (how apt is that!)

ALSO …. I’m offering Google translate on each blog page and post to better service my international followers.

language

I caught this news in my social media NET

  1. NET Incidence UK. New figures from Public Health England confirms the incidence of NETs continues to rise supporting my 2 year old article indicating it was not rare, just less common.  The data was published quietly by NET Patient Foundation in their December 2017 newsletter. Check out the new data by clicking here.
  2. PRRT. Anticipation is rising awaiting the US FDA approval and a NICE statement on expansion in England.  In Scotland, I have anecdotal evidence that PRRT is being set up as a routine service in Glasgow Beaston (will update you when I have something concrete).  Read the updated post here.
  3. Pheochromocyoma/Paraganglioma.  Check out news of a new drug in the pipeline – Azedra (not approved yet) – click here.

Blog Site Activity  

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these articles created or majorly updated in Dec 2017 may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs. You can actually sign up to receive my blog articles direct to your inbox when published – subscribe here.

  NETs – A Surveillance Society – make sure you are getting the right checks
  Updated version of Somatostatin Analogues Pipeline (including news of delivery systems – smaller needles, nasal spray, capsules)
  Great video update from Dr Jonathan Strosberg

graphic courtesy of ITM AG
Expanding PRRT update
  My November Newsletter in case you missed it.

Other Activity

December was quiet but I’m out there looking for opportunities to spread awareness and advance the cause of Neuroendocrine Cancer patients.  Thank you all so much for the support in helping me do this.

  • Please join my 2018 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

  • I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer
  • Please also note that due to sheer numbers of requests, I cannot accept telephone or video calls on a one to one basis. Please just message me and I will respond – see “Send Message” button when you CLICK HERE. (also please ‘Like’ this page if you have not already done so)
  • The number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.
  • In December, the total number of people from USA on my main Facebook page exceeded 3000 – check out the announcement here.

New Audiences for NET Cancer

From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETs rather than just share stuff within our own community. I’m doing this although it may not always be apparent.

  • Article features.
    • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more. In October, I was featured in Cure Magazine twice.  I have been so busy in 2017 but I have plans to increase my presence there in 2018:
“Cancer isn’t all about me”
“Poker Face or Cancer Card”
  • Twitter. I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of research stuff there, in addition to new audiences. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  There are people regularly retweeting my stuff who do not have a personal interest in NETs. In Dec, I tweeted 140 times on my personal account which led to over 100,000 views.  I was mentioned 90 times by other tweeters, 2526 people looked at my profile and I gained 40 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.
  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. This has been a huge success from my point of view. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.  I’ve been pushing this newsletter quite a bit in Dec which has upped my subscriber base to 415 – a 10% increase on last month.
  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences in addition to enriching my experience as a Patient Leader.  WEGO is a fantastic organisation!

WEGO Awards

Speaking Engagements

On 16 November, I spoke for around 45 minutes at an Ipsen sponsored NET Nurse event in Birmingham. Tough gig!  Post to follow when I have the official photos. Still waiting on feedback from the sponsor.

Watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently.

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In December, I accelerated past 445,000 views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing!  On track for half a million by end of February 2018.

Facebook Milestone.  I would love to have achieved 6000 followers by the end of 2017 but that is now an almost impossible challenge without your direct involvement!  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested. There are buttons to share the page and invite others to ‘Like’ it.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (go to these pages and click on ‘Like’)

These are fallback  sites to counter the Facebook algorithm whereby you may not see all my posts on the main site (click on the links to see the pages)

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 240 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

An amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments and private messages give me inspiration or at least a chance to explain further – and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in December.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

Update: Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors

This is an excellent and positive video based overview of where we are with the Management of NETs.  This is a presentation from a NET Specialist (who some of you may know) presenting to a “GI Malignancies” conference.  This is therefore not only awareness of NETs, it’s also some good education for non NET GI experts who may only know the very basics. Useful for patients too!  I met Dr Strosberg in Barcelona (ENETS 2017) and thanked him for his presentational and scientific paper output which I often use in my articles.

The classification picture is good as it explains the different facets of NETs and how NETs are classified and categorised in a general way – not seen it done this way before.   Slightly out of date as it does not adequately convey the possibility of a well differentiated high grade recently classified by the World Health Organisation – read more here.

Amazingly it is delivered without using the word ‘carcinoid’ other than in reference to syndrome, indicating it can be done and is something also being reflected in all my posts to ensure they are up to date with the latest nomenclature.  It’s also a good example for GI doctors as this branch of medicine is often involved in NET diagnostics and surveillance.

Excellent update of all the trials which have introduced treatments in the last decade.

Screenshot 2017-12-12 16.34.54

Great update and worth the 30 minutes it takes to watch – you can view it CLICK HERE.

 

 

All graphics courtesy of www.oncologytube.com

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Read my Cure Magazine contributions

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

Please Share this post

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter NOVEMBER 2017

Welcome to Ronny Allan’s Community newsletter for November 2017. A very strong beginning of the month due to massive support for my Halloween themed but very serious and hard-hitting post “Neuroendocrine Tumors – no treats, just tricks“. If you’ve not seen it or commented on it, check it out here on the Facebook site (currently 724 shares). I suspect the number of shares will never be beaten (there were 652 within 36 hours) and as far as I know perhaps this is now the most shared NET awareness post ever on social media. The support for this single post was so phenomenal; it actually eclipsed my entire NET Cancer Day effort on 10 Nov! I am so grateful to those who made that happen ♥

That said, I was actually pretty quiet on NET Cancer Day. You have to remember that my contribution is mostly social media, that is my strong point and that is where I focus. It’s a great platform in the ‘awareness battlespace’ for many medical conditions. Moreover, it is where we will find new audiences. More and more doctors of all specialities are joining social media on a daily basis – we need them to find out about NETs.

I was quiet for much of November due to a wee bit of exhaustion, coupled with a slight depression that another year of ‘same old’ messages was taking place. Despite this, I still managed to dominate the social media #LetsTalkAboutNETs campaign.

AND ….. I’m now officially ronnyallan.NET (how apt is that!)

If English is not your first language, please check out my language gadget on each page and post of my blog site:

language

I caught this news in my social media NET

(did you see what I did there?)

  1. Pheochromocytoma is something I’ve written about before but this video from NET Cancer Day (courtesy of the PheoPara Alliance) is a classic example of how I believe we should do awareness – it’s about real things happening to real people rather than gimmicky BAWSA stuff.  If you have not seen this short video, check it out here.
  2. New Treatments on the horizon – short video from Dr Matthew Kulke with my additional comment – check it our here
  3. RIP Sunny Susan Anderson, patient legend – check out this link

Blog Site Activity  

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs. You can actually sign up to receive my blog articles direct to your inbox when published – subscribe here.

 Hormones – The NET Effect Horrible Hormones – totally revamped post and now a reference article on my site. https://www.facebook.com/NETCancerBlog/posts/968176113320680
 7 year itch The 7 Year Itch.  Living with NETs! https://ronnyallan.com/2017/11/20/the-7-year-itch/
 the-p-word The P Word has a bit of a renaissance period in Nov with many people showing a renewed interest in the subject of palliative care https://ronnyallan.com/2016/11/18/palliative-care-it-might-just-save-your-life/
 Newsletter Oct 17 October Newsletter  – in case you missed it https://ronnyallan.com/2017/11/01/network-with-ronny-community-newsletter-october-2017/
 poker face Poker Face or Cancer Card – my second article in Cure Magazine https://www.curetoday.com/community/ronny-allan/2017/10/poker-face-or-cancer-card

Other Activity

November didn’t seem like a busier month in terms of blogging despite several personal challenges and external projects on the go.  Striking a balance remains difficult, I’m keen to support and advocate but as a patient, I also need my own time.  I still managed to break records in November, mainly due follow on support for my Halloween themed post on 31st Oct.  Thank you all so much for the support.

Please join my 2018 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer

Please also note I cannot accept telephone or video calls on a one to one basis (please just message me and I will respond).  Also, the number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.

Awareness Activity in November 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETs rather than just share stuff within our own community. I’m doing this!

  • Article features.
    • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more. In October, I was featured in Cure Magazine twice:
“Cancer isn’t all about me”
“Poker Face or Cancer Card”
  • Twitter. I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of research stuff there, in addition to new audiences. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  There are people regularly retweeting my stuff who do not have a personal interest in NETs. In Nov, I tweeted 250 times on my personal account which led to 152,000 views.  I was mentioned 160 times by other tweeters, 3322 people looked at my profile and I gained 48 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.Nov tweets
  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.  Currently 387 subscribers – up 13 on last month.

nuzzel

 

  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences in addition to enriching my experience as a Patient Leader.  WEGO is a fantastic organisation!

WEGO Awards

 

  • Macmillan Cancer Support.  I’m proud to be a ‘Voice’ and ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum.  In addition I help ‘outliers’ from the NET community there. There are only 27 champions for a site supporting hundreds of thousand patients – it’s a community of communities.   This is the biggest cancer support organisation in the UK and I’m intent on developing relationships with various departments in this fantastic organisation.  They published an article recognising NET Cancer Day (might be the first time they ever did) – check it out here:

Speaking Engagements

On 16 November, I spoke for around 45 minutes at an Ipsen sponsored NET Nurse event in Birmingham. Tough gig!  Post to follow when I have the official photos.

Writing and other types of Engagement (external)

Watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently.

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In November, I accelerated past 430,000 views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing!  On track for half a million by end of February 2018.

Facebook Milestone.  I would love to achieve 6000 followers by the end of 2017 but that is now an almost impossible challenge without your direct involvement!  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (go to these pages and click on ‘Like’)

These are fallback  sites to counter the Facebook algorithm whereby you may not see all my posts on the main site (click on the links to see the pages)

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 230 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

WOW!  – that’s an amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments (and private messages) give me inspiration (or at least a chance to explain further) and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in November.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

 

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – the 7 Year Itch

7 year itch

I quite like the Facebook memory thing. This morning I got a reminder of a post I made from 7 years ago whilst I was in hospital recovering from my 9 Nov surgery.  It had taken 12 days for me to feel strong enough to venture onto social media with a simple message “I’m feeling perkier”.  For those not familiar with English localisms, it just means lively, spirited, bright, sunny, cheerful, animated, upbeat, buoyant, bubbly, cheery, bouncy, genial, jaunty, chirpy, sprightly, vivacious, in fine fettle, full of beans, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed.  I guess I met some of these descriptors most of the time! I had gotten through the worst and the light at the end of the tunnel was now a faint glimmer.

I’ve recently had a ton of ‘7 years ago cancerversaries’ and there’s still a few to go! I’m currently being reminded of an issue that started just after my initial treatment and by coincidence (perhaps?) the commencement of my Lanreotide (Somatuline Autogel).  Itching!  However, for me, it’s mainly the right leg below the knee (go figure!). Much less frequently on my arms and sides.  I know many people have the same issue but no-one ever seems to find out why – I guess it’s that Neuroendocrine jigsaw thing again?

Initially, I put the issue down to Lanreotide, as this is mentioned in the side effect list on the drug instructions.  The initial connection was made because it seemed to be happening immediately after my monthly ‘dart’.  A really annoying itch mostly around my ankles and which had to be scratched!  An application of a general emollient cream for a few days seemed to do the trick and after a week it was gone (until the next injection …..). However, after a few years, I sensed the issue was drifting away from the injection cycle and adopting a different and more random pattern.  I’m also suspicious of a nutritional connection and checking my article Nutrition for NETs -Vitamins and Mineral Challenges, I can see Vit B3 (Niacin) and Vit E are mentioned in regards skin issues.  I’d be confused if this was an issue today as I now take plenty supplements to offset GI malabsorption.  However, I probably wasn’t taking sufficient between surgery and 2013 as I lacked the knowledge to do so at the time.  So nutritional deficiency remains a possibility or at least an added complication.  The most recent outbreak has unusually gone on for the last 4 weeks.

I also seem to have had an eczema type issue in my right ear and mild rosacea for more than 7 years (pre diagnosis).  As you can imagine my ‘inner detective’ is working overtime!  One thing is clear – this itchy leg issue has plagued me for 7 years.

I know that many people have real issues with rashes and skin itching, I’ve seen this so many times with some people describing it as severe.  Clearly when this is the case, a doctor’s intervention is generally required.  I’ve seen the following connections to NETs and skin issues:

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter OCTOBER 2017

Hi NETworkers!

Welcome to Ronny Allan’s Community newsletter for October 2017.  A very strong end of the month due to massive support for my Halloween themed but very serious and hard-hitting post “Neuroendocrine Tumors – no treats, just tricks”. If you’ve not seen it or commented on it, check it out here on the Facebook site.  I suspect the number of shares will never be beaten (652 in 36 hours).  31 Oct 2017 is now the biggest number of views on any one day, breaking the previous record set in Jan 2017.  It also made October 2017 the highest monthly views ever.  I am so grateful to those who made that happen ♥

What’s in the NET News

The following news items may be of interest:

  The huge (but expected) news that Novartis Novartis (manufacturers of Octreotide) is purchasing Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) (manufacturers of Lutathera Lu-177 (as used in PRRT)). This is a significant acquisition and should benefit the NET community given the size of Novartis and the potential of PRRT worldwide. It will be interesting to see if this has an impact on the UK approval

Read more here.

  I wasn’t at NANETS but did check most of the output consolidated into this post – Read more here
  GA-68 PET (NETSPOT) continues to roll out across the USA, see CCFs latest list by clicking here.
Made it to 3 finals in the WEGO Health awards, I posted about this  here.

Blog Site?  

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs. You can actually sign up to receive my blog articles direct to your inbox when published – subscribe here.

 Neuroendocrine Cancer – Trick or Treat.  This ‘themed’ post generated a huge amount of sharing, breaking all previous records.  See more in the newsletter.
  A summary of NET stuff from NANETS 2017
 “You’re Cured” – Topical and controversial in NETs. My opinion.
Weight can be an issue in NETs.  It did actually trigger my diagnosis.
The shock effect never wears off.  My private messages are full of disturbing stories, not just about diagnostic issues but support and care received.  A new campaign.
Genetics and NETs.
My first article for Cure Magazine “It’s not all about me” 

 

Other Activity

October was a busier month in terms of blogging despite several personal challenges and external projects on the go.  Striking a balance remains difficult, I’m keen to support and advocate but as a patient, I also need my own time.  I still managed to break 2 records in October, mainly due to my Halloween themed post on 31st.  The biggest amount of view in any one day had stood since Jan 2017 and was totally smashed, as was the best month too.   Thank you all so much for the support.

Please join my 2017 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer.  Please also note that I cannot accept telephone calls on a one to one basis.  Also, the number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.

Awareness Activity in October 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETS rather than just share stuff within our own community. I’m doing this!

  • Article features.
    • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more. In October, I was featured in Cure Magazine twice:
“Cancer isn’t all about me”
“Poker Face or Cancer Card”
  • Twitter. I took part in a WEGO Health patient leader chat on twitter where I was able to contribute to some general cancer questions (subject chronic illnesses).  It was attended by many patient advocates representing many different conditions. The taking part in these activities is time-consuming and mentally hard work but it does allow me to grow as a general patient advocate and to occasionally mention “Neuroendocrine Cancer” spreads awareness to new audiences!  A summary of the conversation can be found here.
  • I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of my research stuff there. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  In Oct, I tweeted 218 times on my personal account which lead to almost 89,000 views.  I was mentioned 160 times by other tweeters and gained 49 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.

 

  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.  Currently 374 subscribers – up 11% on last month.

  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences in addition to enriching my experience as a Patient Leader.  WEGO is a fantastic organisation!

  • Macmillan Cancer Support.  I’m proud to be a ‘Voice’ and ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum.  In addition I help ‘outliers’ from the NET community there. There are only 27 champions for a site supporting hundreds of thousand patients – it’s a community of communities.   This is the biggest cancer support organisation in the UK and I’m intent on developing relationships with various departments in this fantastic organisation.  They have recently agreed to feature NETs on 10 Nov 17 and I’m writing an article in preparation.
that’s me in the centre

Speaking Engagements

  • I was delighted to speak to the South Wales NET patient group (sponsored by NET Patient Foundation).  Here’s some pictures of Chris and I with the group and the local NET Specialist. Dr Mo Khan is setting up a brand new NET Service in Wales – great news for this group.
Left to right: Nikie Jervis (Nurse from NET Patient Forum), Sally Jenkins NET Cardiff, me, Yolande Mears NET Swansea, Chris (my wife)
Dr Mohid Khan – NET Specialist Wales – great supporter of my blog and NET patients Quality of Life
  • On 16 November, subject to contract, I’ve been invited to speak for around an 45 minutes at an Ipsen sponsored NET Nurse event in Birmingham. Tough gig!  Post to follow if allowed by contractual arrangements.

Writing and other types of Engagement (external) – watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently.  I’m currently in a pool of patients who may be featured in a UK national, fingers crossed.  Writing an article for Macmillan on NET Cancer Day.

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In October, I accelerated past 400,000 views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing!  On track for half a million by Easter 2018.

Facebook Milestone.  I would love to achieve 6000 followers by the end of 2017 but this will be a challenge.  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (go to these pages and click on ‘Like’)

These are fallback  sites to counter the Facebook algorithm whereby you may not see all my posts on the main site (click on the links to see the pages)

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 230 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

  • Facebook 5337.  This is a key outlet for my blog – please encourage others to like my page (if you’d like to know how to use your Facebook to invite others to my page – let me know, I can provide you with a step by step approach).
  • Twitter4202 / 3252 Follow me here @RonnyAllan1 / @NETCancerBlog

 

Neuroendocrine Cancer – no treats, just tricks
Neuroendocrine Cancer – Tumour Markers and Hormone Levels 
Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – Home Page
Steve Jobs – the most famous Neuroendocrine Cancer Ambassador we NEVER had
Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer? – 10 questions to ask your doctor
Background to my Diagnosis and Treatment

WOW!  – that’s an amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments (and private messages) give me inspiration (or at least a chance to explain further) and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in October.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

 

Neuroendocrine Cancer – normally slow but always sneaky?

 

cancer cells attack

There’s a lot of scary diseases in this world but some of them are particularly spooky.  One such spooky disease is the lesser known type of cancer that infiltrated my body – Neuroendocrine Cancer (aka Neuroendocrine Tumors or NET for short).  Not only is it scary and spooky, but it’s also cunning, devious, misleading, double-crossing, and it likes nothing better than to play tricks on you.

It will grow in your body without you knowing.  It finds places to hide, mainly the small intestine, appendix, lungs, stomach, pancreas, rectum and a host of other places. It can be fiendishly small to avoid being seen.  Once it’s established in the primary location (….or locations), it will try to break out via your blood and lymphatic systems.  It wants to establish other bases in your mesentery, your liver, your lymph nodes, your bones and any other place it can get to.

It can often be uncannily quiet, not showing any symptoms. However, sometimes it wants to have fun by over-secreting certain hormones to add or introduce symptoms which mimic many other diseases such as IBS, asthma, abdominal upset, diarrhea, flushing. These are just more tricks up its sleeve.  You will go to your doctor, perhaps many times, to report what looks like routine/regular symptoms. Unfortunately, it’s also really good at tricking your doctors. After several visits and despite your concerns, your doctors could become so frustrated that nothing serious is obvious, they might even start to think it’s all in your head. This is exactly what Neuroendocrine Cancer wants, it’s just getting started.

One particular type of NET has a wicked trick up its sleeve.  This one will over-secrete a hormone called Serotonin which can often cause fibrosis in your abdominal area, potentially causing obstructions and damage to major organs and blood vessels.  It’s not finished though, it will also try to introduce fibrosis to the right side of your heart causing more life threatening issues. In addition to common symptoms of flushing, this type and others will also make you feel weak, fatigued, pain, agitated, anxious, dizzy, nauseous, jaundiced, acid reflux, skin irritation, anemic, lose weight and give you heart palpitations.  It’s a real Witch’s Brew of symptoms and living with it is often not easy.  Its main trick is to prevent you from being correctly diagnosed and it’s pretty good at it.

However, it has a ‘finale’ trick.  Neuroendocrine Cancer actually wants to kill you, and if it’s left to plough its relentless path throughout your body, that’s exactly what it will do, slowly but surely. 

It’s not just slow and scary, it can also be deadly. Spread the word and help save a life.

If you are suspicious you have Neuroendocrine Cancer but not yet formally diagnosed, you may appreciate this article.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

wego-blog-2018-winner

patients included
This is a Patients Included Site

PLEASE CONSIDER SHARING THIS POST – YOU MAY SAVE SOMEONE’S LIFE

Can NETs be cured?

cure quote

OPINION:

“Cured” – In cancer, this word can evoke a number of emotions. Interestingly, not all these emotions will be as positive as you might think. If you want to spark a heated debate on a Neuroendocrine Cancer patient forum, just mention that you’ve been cured.

I’ve been living with Neuroendocrine Cancer for 8 years so I must be cured, right? Unfortunately not as straightforward as this, and I’m guessing this is the case for many cancers. Doctors clearly need to be careful when saying the word “cured‘ even if there is a small likelihood that a cancer will recur.  There’s plenty of ‘conservative’ and alternative terms that can be used, such as ‘stable’, ‘no evidence of disease (NED)’, ‘in remission’ or ‘complete response’.  However, I don’t see the latter two much in Neuroendocrine disease circles.

So with all these ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’, what exactly is a cure?

Answering this question isn’t a simple case of ‘yes’ or ‘no’, because it depends on the way that the term ‘cancer’ is defined. It should actually be viewed as an umbrella term for a collection of hundreds of different diseases. They all share the fundamental characteristic of rogue cells growing out of control, but each type of cancer, and each person’s individual cancer, is unique and comes with its own set of challenges.

That’s why it’s very unlikely that there will be one single cure that can wipe out all cancers. That doesn’t mean individual cases of cancer can’t be cured. Many cancers in fact already can be. Scientists aren’t actually on the hunt for a ‘silver bullet’ against all cancers, Quite the opposite. The more scientists get to know each type of cancer inside and out, the greater the chance of finding new ways to tackle these diseases so that more people can survive. Thanks to a much deeper understanding of cell biology and genetics, there exist today a growing number of targeted therapies that have been designed at a molecular level to recognise particular features specific of cancer cells. Along with chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, these treatments—used singly and in combination—have led to a slow, but steady, increase in survival rates. You can definitely count Neuroendocrine Cancer in that category.

Cancer is seen today less as a disease of specific organs, and more as one of molecular mechanisms caused by the mutation of specific genes. The implication of this shift in thinking is that the best treatment for, say, colorectal cancer may turn out to be designed and approved for use against tumors in an entirely different part of the body, such as the breast. We’re certainly seeing that with certain targeted therapies and more recently with Immunotherapy.

Surely a cure is more possible if cancer is diagnosed earlier?

To a certain extent this is true for many types of cancer, not just for NETs.  In fact the same scientists did say ….”We detect those attacks when they’re still early, before the cancers have widely spread, at a time when they can still be cured simply by surgery or perhaps surgery and adjuvant therapy, which always works better on smaller tumors.”.  

What about Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs)?  Clearly I’m not qualified to make such statements except to say that I am of the opinion that earlier diagnosis is better for any curative scenario.  When you read NET guidelines (ENETS/NANETS etc), the word ‘cure’ and ‘curative’ is mentioned in relation to surgery.  Bearing in mind that our most expert NET specialists are involved in the drafting of these guidelines, perhaps we should pause and think before dismissing these claims.  Having checked ENETS publications, I can see it’s related to certain conditions and factors such as localisation within the organ, tumour size, good resection margins, and a suitable follow-up surveillance.

Clearly with advanced disease, the cancer becomes incurable but treatment for many being palliative to reduce tumor bulk and reduce any symptoms and/or syndrome effects. Despite this, the outlook for metastatic NETs at the lower grades is good. While we’re talking about palliative care, do not confuse this with end of life, that is only one end of the palliative spectrum.  It can and is used at the earliest stage of cancer.

Immunotherapy will eventually cure cancer, right?

Immunotherapy will play a huge part in cancer treatment in the future, that we know.  But to suggest that it’s a cure is probably overstating its current success.  Neuroendocrine Cancer has not been forgotten – you can read more about Neuroendocrine Cancer and Immunotherapy here.

I heard the Oncolytic Virus at Uppsala is a cure for NETs?

There is currently no scientific evidence that the Oncolytic Virus (AdVince) can cure humans with Neuroendocrine Cancer.  So far it has only been proven in destroying neuroendocrine tumours in mice. The Oncolytic Viruses developed in Uppsala are now being evaluated in phase I clinical trials for neuroendocrine cancer.  If you’re not up to speed with this trial, read more here – Oncolytic Virus Uppsala

Isn’t prevention better than a cure?

This old adage is still relevant BUT latest thinking would indicate it is not applicable to all cancers.  Scientists claim that 66% of cancer is  simply a form of ‘bad luck’ and if the claim is accurate, it follows that many cancers are simply inevitable. The thinking suggests that random errors occurring during DNA replication in normal stem cells are a major contributing factor in cancer development confirming that “bad luck” explains a far greater number of cancers than do hereditary and environmental factors. This scientific thinking is a tad controversial so it’s worth remembering that even if, as this study suggests, most individual cancer mutations are due to random chance, the researchers also admit that the cancers they cause may still be preventable. It’s complex!

The newspapers are always talking about breakthroughs and cures for cancer?

Newspapers looking for a good headline will use words such as ‘cure’. Sadly, headlines are generally written by sub-editors who scan the article and look to find a ‘reader-oriented angle’ for the heading. They either can’t or don’t have time to understand what’s actually being said. Unfortunately this then leads to people sharing what is now a misleading article without a thought for the impact on those who are worried about the fact they have cancer and whether it can be cured or not.  There’s also a lot of fake health news out there – check out my article series about the problems with the internet and ‘Miracle Cures’.

To cure, they must know the cause?  

To a certain extent, that’s very accurate.  Have you ever wondered what caused your NETs?  I did ponder this question in an article here.  The only known cause of NETs is currently the proportion of patients with heredity syndromes – see my article of Genetics and Neuroendocrine Cancer.  Interestingly, the NET Research Foundation recently awarded funding to look at the causes of Small Intestine (SI) NETs (one of the most common types).  A scientific collaboration between UCL, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, UCSF Medical Centre and the UCL Cancer Institute / Royal Free Hospital London. The team’s approach has the potential to identify inherited, somatic (non-inherited) genetic, epigenetic and infectious causes of SI-NETs.  The research is questioning whether SI-NETs are caused by DNA changes in later life or by aberrant genes inherited at birth; environmental influences or infectious agents – or is it a combination of all these factors?  Very exciting. Read more here.

What would a cure mean to those living with NETs?

This is something that has crossed my mind, even though I don’t believe it will happen in my lifetime.  I guess it would be good to get rid of the known remnant tumors left behind from my treatment (and any micrometastases currently not detectable).  However, many NET patients are living with the consequences of cancer and its treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, biological therapy, somatostatin analogues, radionuclide therapy, liver directed therapy, and others.  Many of these effects would remain – let’s face it, a cure is not going to give me back bits of my small and large intestine, liver and an army of lymph nodes. So support for those living with NETs would need to remain despite a cure.

Summary

The emotional aspect of the word ‘cured’ seems to be an issue across many cancers and it’s certainly very controversial in NET circles.  The world has still not cured the many cancers that exist. But over the next five to ten years the era of personalised medicine could see enormous progress in making cancer survivable.  I think both doctors and patients need to take a pragmatic view on the ‘cured’ word and to end this article I wanted to share an interesting quote I found whilst researching.

cure quote

Weight – the NET Effect

Weight – The NET Effect

Firstly, let me say that I have no intention of advising you how to lose or gain weight!  Rather, I’d like to discuss what factors might be involved and why people with NETs might lose or gain weight either at diagnosis or after treatment.  Clearly I can talk freely about my own experience and associated weight issues. If nothing else, it might help some in thinking about what is causing their own weight issues.

I wrote a patient story for an organisation over 3 years ago and it started with the words  “Did you mean to lose weight”.  Those were actually the words a nurse said to me after I nonchalantly told her I thought I’d lost some weight (….about half a stone).  I answered the question with “no” and this response triggered a sequence of events that led to all the stories in all the posts in this blog (i.e. my diagnosis).

I annoyingly can’t remember at which point I started to lose the weight but I was initially reported to have Iron Deficiency Anemia due to a low hemoglobin result and my subsequent iron test (Serum Ferritin) was also low and out of normal range.  This, combined with the weight loss, the GP was spot on by referring me to a clinic.  The sequence of events during the referral led to a diagnosis of metastatic NETs (Small Intestine Primary). If I had been a betting man, I would have put money on my GP thinking “Colorectal Cancer”.  So my adage “If your doctors don’t suspect something, they won’t detect anything” applies.

I can also tell you that I weigh myself most days at the same time using the same scales. Weight loss or gain needs to be recorded.  Clearly 2 or 3 pounds is nothing to worry about, I found you could put on or lose that amount in a day, depending on time of weighing and food intake. I’m looking for downwards or upwards trends of 7lbs or more (3kg).

Why did I lose weight?

The drop from 12st to 11st was clearly something to do with the anemia symptom (the NETs). But after diagnosis, I had major surgery about 10 weeks later.  When I left the hospital after my 19 day stay, I was a whole stone lighter (14 lbs or 6.3 kg).  I guess 3 feet of intestine, the cecum, an ascending colon, a bit of a transverse colon together with an army of lymph nodes and other abdominal ‘gubbins’ actually weighs a few pounds.

However, add the gradual introduction of foods to alleviate pressure on the ‘new plumbing’, and this is also going to have an effect on weight.  I remember my Oncologist after the surgery saying to use full fat milk – the context is lost in memory but I guess he was trying to help me put weight back on.  I also vividly remember many of my clothes not fitting me after this surgery. In fact, since 2010, I’ve actually dropped 2 trouser sizes and one shirt/jumper size.  I did spend a lot of time in the toilet over the coming months, so I guess that also had an impact!  However, what I wasn’t aware of was the side effect of my surgery.  I started to put on some weight in time for my next big surgery – a liver resection.  The average adult liver weighs 1.5 kg so I lost another 1 kg in one day based on a 66% liver resection.

However, what was also going on was something that took me a while to figure out – malabsorption and vitamin/mineral deficiency. My new ‘plumbing’ wasn’t really as efficient as my old one, so the malabsorption. issues caused by a lack of terminal ileum was slowly starting to have an effect. The commencement of Lanreotide in Dec 2010 added to this complication. That knowledge led me to understand some of the more esoteric nutritional issues that can have a big effect on NET patients and actually lead to a host of side effects that might be confused with one of the several NET syndromes.  What it also confirmed to me was that I could still eat foods I enjoy without worrying too much about the effect on my remnant tumours or the threat of a recurrence of my carcinoid syndrome, something I was experiencing prior to and after diagnosis.

Armed with the ‘consequences of NETs’ knowledge, I did eventually adjust my diet and my weight has now ‘flat-lined’ at around 10 st 7 lbs (give or take 1 or 2 lbs fluctuation).  Amazingly, the same weight I was when I left hospital after major surgery, looking thin and gaunt and not very well at all!  The difference to day is that I have adapted to my new weight and look fit and healthy.

I actually lost another half a stone (7 lbs or 3.5 kg) in 2014 whilst training for an 84 mile charity walk – many commented that I looked thin and gaunt despite being extremely fit from all the training. Perspectives.  It took several months to put the weight back on but at least I knew what had caused the loss and then subsequent gain.

I don’t have any appetite issues although I try to avoid big meals due to a shorter gut, so I snack more.  With the exception of the 4 months of intense training for the 84 mile hike, I cannot seem to lose or gain weight.  As my current weight is bang in the middle of the BMI green zone (healthy), I’m content.

Why do NET patients lose weight?

That’s a tricky one but any authoritative resource will confirm fairly obvious things such as (but not limited to) loss of appetite and side effects of cancer treatments.  NETs can be complex so I resorted to researching the ISI Book on NETs, a favourite resource of mine.  I wanted to check out any specific mentions of weight and NETs whether at diagnosis or beyond. Here’s some of the things I found out:

Carcinoid Syndrome.  Weight loss is listed but not as high a percentage as I thought – although it tends to be tied into those affected most with diarrhea.

Gastrinoma/Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome.  Up to half of these patients will have weight loss at diagnosis.

Glucagonoma.  90% will have weight loss.

Pheochromocytoma.   Weight loss is usual.

Somatostatinoma.  Weight loss in one-third of pancreatic cases and one-fifth in intestinal cases.

VIPoma.  Weight loss is usual.

MEN Syndromes.  One of the presentational symptoms can be weight loss.

Secondary Effects of NETs.

Many NETs can result in diabetes (particularly certain pNETs) and as somatostatin analogues can inhibit insulin, it could push those at borderline levels into formal diabetic levels (including any type of NET using long term somatostatin analogues).  In people with diabetes, insufficient insulin prevents the body from getting glucose from the blood into the body’s cells to use as energy. When this occurs, the body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. 

Hypothyroidism is another potential issue. 

It must be emphasised that there will always be exceptions and the above will not apply to every single patient with one of the above.

What about weight gain?

You always associate weight loss with cancer patients but there are some types of NETs and associated syndromes which might actually cause weight gain.  Here’s what I found from ISI and other sources (as mentioned):

Cushing’s Syndrome.  Centripetal weight gain is mentioned.  (Centripetal – tends to the centre of the body).  I also noted that Cushing’s Syndrome tends to be much more prevalent in females. Cushing’s syndrome comprises the signs and symptoms caused by excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol (hypercortisolism) or by an overdosage of drugs known as glucocorticoids.

Insulinoma. Weight gain occurs in around 40% of cases, because patients may eat frequently to avoid symptoms.  However, according to an Insulinoma support group site, I did note that after treatment (some stability), things can improve.

Again, it must be emphasised that there will always be exceptions and the above will not apply to every single patient with one of the above.  As in weight loss scenarios, the Secondary Effects of NETs can have an effect.  Hypothyroidism is another potential issue and weight gain is a listed symptom.  I just been diagnosed with hypothyroidism this year but I was not gaining weight!  

The NETs Jigsaw

Like anything in NETs, things can get complex.  So it is entirely possible that weight loss or weight gain is directly caused by NETs, can be caused by side effects/secondary effects of treatment, and it’s also possible that it could be something unrelated to NETs (Dr Liu “Even NET patients get regular illnesses“).  I guess some people might have a good idea of the reason for theirs – my initial weight loss was without doubt caused by the cancer and the post diagnostic issues caused by the consequences of the cancer.

Summary

I guess that weight loss or weight gain can be a worry. I also suspect that people might be happy to lose or gain weight if they were under/over weight before diagnosis (every cloud etc).  However, if you are progressively losing weight, I encourage you to seek advice soonest or ask to see a dietician (preferably one who understands NETs).

Edit:  I changed my blood thinner in May 2017 and lost 2kg (4 pounds) after 6 months.

Edit: I started Creon at the beginning of 2018 (read about this here) and almost immediately put on 2kg (4 pounds) to offset the 2kg loss from 6 months prior.  However, no real change after 3 months of Creon (March 2018).

Edit: I was recently diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, one of the symptoms can be weight gain.  Clearly that has not applied to me.  Hyperthyroidism is the opposite condition where weight loss is a symptom.

Edit: Due to a bad chest infection in June 2018 and due to the consequences of the effects of that illness and most likely the treatments undergone, I have dropped three quarters of a stone (~10lbs).  My lightest weight for over 30 years.   To me that is a significant loss of weight in such a short space of time. Currently trying to put it back on again – I need the weight!

Edit: 4 Sep 2018. After the 10lbs (~4.5kg) loss following the chest infection, people who see me regularly have noticed the visible difference. I’m still struggling to get back beyond 10st after 2 months. I’m monitoring this really closely.

Edit: 28 Nov 2018. I’m back at 10st after increasing my dosage of Creon.

Edit: 10 Jan 2019.  I’m back at 10st 3lbs, my approximate weight before the chest infection.  It’s taken 7 months and the recent acceleration coincides with Creon dose increase.

Edit 7th Feb 2019.  Changed from Creon to Nutrizym.

Edit: 17 Mar 2019.  It appears my trouser waist size is back to 32″.  Is the use of Pancreatic Enzymes making me eat more, or getting more nutrients through, or making me eat food which makes me put on weight?

For those wishing to see the output from an online discussion with Tara Whyand on the subject of ‘Weight’ issues for NET patients – please see this link inside my closed Facebook group.

weight online chat
Click the Link to see the online event output

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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The shock effect never wears off

The Hidden NET patient voices

Patient stories are key to any awareness campaign.  Nothing like a human being standing up and letting you know about their experience.  Many are positive examples of how they are overcoming their trials and tribulations, others tell stories of a struggle. They all have different styles, some are the ‘kick ass’ type stories, some are just thankful, some are reflective – all of them are perfectly acceptable. I normally like to place myself somewhere in the middle with phrases like “I’m still here“, although I can veer left and right when the mood takes me!

Because of my social media footprint, I get a lot of private messages from people across the globe. Many are from people who have no wish to go public and that’s fine. Many are from people who value my opinion and that’s humbling. On forums, you can get 50 answers (all well meaning ones), with me you normally only get one (even if it’s a “I don’t know”).  Most are fairly easy to answer, just a link to something or asking for one of my articles they can’t seem to find.  Some are a bit trickier but I get there in the end.  Some are pretty worrying and really difficult to answer.  And nearly all of them amplify something we already know ……. despite some tremendous medical advances, there’s still a lot of unmet needs for Neuroendocrine Cancer patients, in particular access to NET specialists, access to the best and latest proven treatments and follow-up support for those affected by their experience (physical and mental). I’m talking in a global sense including countries perceived to be advanced in medical terms.

Take Patient A for example.  This patient has a classic well differentiated Small Intestinal NET (Si NET) with lymph node metastasis.  That resulted in fairly complex abdominal surgery that many of us will have had (including myself). For the past year, this patient has struggled with no follow on support, no dietary advice and has been left alone. This patient told me he is actually receiving his follow on advice from my blog site. This patient is also struggling on the emotional side because people say he looks rather well and have commented that he must have been wrongly diagnosed but at least is now “cured“.

Patient ‘B’ is similar.  This patient has had surgery (the surgeon got everything apparently ….) but has been declared non-syndromic on the basis there is no diarrhea.  However, there is flushing, joint paint, general abdominal issues, weight loss, headaches, fatigue, dehydration and chronic constipation.  It took this patient 6 months to find out about a local NET advocate organisation and 10 months to find out there was access to a dietitian.

Patient ‘C’ is worrying.  In this example I was contacted and asked about surveillance intervals as it was noticed I was having regular scans. What I found was someone who had a metastatic midgut NET and not had any surveillance for 3 years (including tumour/hormone marker checks and Echocardiograms).  This is despite an advanced healthcare system and oodles of availability. This patient is now seeing a NET specialist.

Patient ‘D’ had a horrendous experience.  This patient was treated as a bowel cancer case when they had a low-grade classic Si NET …… surgery and then classic bowel adenocarcinoma chemo. Now, it might be that was the only treatment modality available in this patient’s country but it’s a worrying example of the extent of the unmet needs for NET patients in the country concerned.

Patient E is so shocking, I wrote an entire article about this case.  Click here to read it

I could go on with many other examples and I might expand this post downstream.

One thing is very clear to me, we need a new paradigm in international advocacy and we need to start focusing more on these support issues.  As the number of people living with cancer rises, the requirement for post diagnostic support also rises.  Even those who are ‘stable’ need support.  One thing is for sure, the shock effect of what people tell me never wears off because I know there are more shocking stories still to hear.

 

Genetics and Neuroendocrine Tumors


In my article ‘Ever wonder what caused your NET’, I concluded that currently, the only known scientifically explained causes for NETs were hereditary/genetic in nature.  This is mostly associated with those who have MEN syndromes (yes, they are a syndrome not a type of tumour) and a few other less common types of NET including Pheochomocytoma/Paraganglioma (Pheo/Para) and Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) (the familial version of MTC is often referred to as FMTC). However, please note this does not mean that all those diagnosed with pancreatic, parathyroid, pituarity, Pheo/Para and MTC tumours, will have any hereditary or genetic conditions, many will simply be sporadic tumors.

In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a number of Neuroendocrine tumours arise as a result of germline genetic mutations and are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The number of genes implicated is increasing.

Apparently, 5-10% of Gastroenteropancreatic NETs (GEP NETs) are estimated to have a hereditary background. Syndromes associated with these include Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN), Von Hippel Lindau (VHL), Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1), Tuberous Sclerosis (TS) and others. People who have a genetic condition may present with the tumors (perhaps along with an associated syndrome) and so the genetic condition if there is one, may not be known at this point.

genetics locations
Overview of genes with recurrent mutations in NETs and their distribution accordingly to anatomical location. (Please note the percentages on the above diagram may differ depending on where you look).  
Citation: European Journal of Endocrinology 174, 6; 10.1530/EJE-15-0972

How will I know if I am affected? 

Some people do worry about this, often because of what they find on the internet including inside patient forums.  I suspect some people already know via family connections and I guess if you have 2 tumors found in (say) parathyroid and pancreas, it should at least raise a suspicion for MEN1.

Many people say how do I know, how do I check and this is obviously a delicate subject.  Of course, your first port of call should be your NET specialist if you suspect or know of any connection.

Thus why I was interested in a paper published in Springer Link – titled “When should genetic testing be performed in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.”  When reading, you’ll find it’s actually much more than that! Check it out here:

Crossref DOI link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11154-017-9430-3

In this review, the authors examined the features which may lead a clinician to suspect that a patient may have an inherited cause of a NET and they outlined which underlying conditions should be suspected. They also discussed what type of screening may be appropriate in a variety of situations. If there is a way to identify which patients are likely to have a germline mutation, this would enable clinicians to counsel patients adequately about their future disease risk, and allows for earlier detection of at-risk patients through family screening. There’s a couple of minor errors in the text but I’ve contacted the authors.

The authors focused on presentations of NETs of the gastrointestinal system, chromaffin cell tumours (Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma) and Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma. Pituitary tumors (normally associated with MEN1), were not considered in scope for the review.  Interesting, the review includes news of a move by endocrinologists to reclassify ‘Pituitary Adenomas’ as Pituitary NETs (PitNETs). Read the abstract here.  This would appear to be in line with a gradual shift from the benign nomenclature associated with certain NETs to the ‘malignant’ potential of these type of tumors.  The abbreviation is also in line with others, e.g. pNET, SiNET, etc.  A useful reminder that we must stop using the term ‘Carcinoid‘ as this is regressing this extremely useful initiative to highlight the malignant potential of all NETs.

There also appears to be some linkage to the study looking at the possibility of familial Small Intestine NETs (SiNETs).  You can read more about a US registered trial here (with apologies for use of the now defunct term ‘Carcinoid‘).

This is a complex subject and the text above is very basic. If you wish to dig further, the quoted reference is a good read.  Just to emphasise, it’s aim is to provide advice about when to recommend genetic testing for NETs, and in doing so provides some useful reference information.  It’s broken down into 4 distinct tumor groupings:

1.  Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP NETs)

2.  Bronchial/Thymic NETs

3.  Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma  The familial connection with Pheo/Para is complex. Up to 13 genes have been identified including NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2(SDH5), TMEM127, MAXm EPAS1, FH, MDH2.  Read more here (recent update)The NIH also have a useful section – click here.

4.  Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

You may also find this article from the National Cancer Institute very useful.  It has a wider scope but a different aim. Genetics of Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Neoplasias (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version”

I also noted the UKINETS Guidelines for NETs has a section on genetics and includes something called Carney Complex.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook. Like my page for even more news. I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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Cancer Isn’t All About Me

As featured by Cure Magazine
It’s about others too

Since my diagnosis of incurable and metastatic neuroendocrine cancer in 2010, it’s really all been about me. I didn’t see the trauma coming, and my family has supported me throughout every single step. I really don’t want to be the focus of attention as that mantle was normally evenly distributed. However, there’s nothing like a cancer diagnosis to put you into the spotlight.

Facing an uncertain future with regular scans, injections, treatment, pills, examinations and blood tests has made me the center of attention, whether I like it or not. The focus is on me because these things are necessary to keep me alive for as long as possible and also because I live with the consequences of cancer and its treatment which provides further challenges. A good quality of life is not only a motivator for change, good planning and constant surveillance, but it’s also hard work and has an additional impact on the whole family. It means all activities including work, holidays, days out, social activities and, even the simple act of eating, might all need to be organized around me due to the vagaries of my condition. It will never stop, it will never end and it will always be about me!

This has gone on for seven years and counting. “Cancerversaries” are on the calendar alongside birthdays and wedding anniversaries. Tumor marker tests and scans are reviewed twice yearly so the relentless attention continues, often peaking at these test milestones and worrying moments in between. The detailed analysis of unusual pain or other disturbances are documented. The attention is on me.

Then, my wife finds a lump. The local doctor investigates and refers her for a mammogram. The mammogram check leads to an ultrasound which then leads to a biopsy of some fibrous tissue. We have a two-week wait before the all clear is given but the worry doesn’t immediately dissipate as another check was scheduled for three months (done, no issues).  The following check 6 months after on 7 Aug 2018 is also no change.   Hang on a minute … this is not about me!

I’m starting to realize it shouldn’t be all about me and it needn’t be all about me. It’s about other people, too. There is nothing in the rule book that allows cancer to be limited to a single family member. Cancer doesn’t really care how many in your household already have the disease – anyone is a target. It’s bad enough having one cancer patient in the house without another cropping up. One thing is for sure, when it comes to a cancer diagnosis in the family, I really want it to be all about me.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

 

Postscript:  Very excited to share my first article published in CURE magazine. This is a real story about recent events involving my own family. As a long-term cancer patient, it can seem like it’s always about ‘me’ and then something happens which changes that perception. It’s actually about others too, and always has been. If you want to talk about something similar in your life, please share with others in your comments below or  message me. 

This is the beginning of a new phase in my activities and another opportunity to spread awareness of Neuroendocrine Cancer to new audiences, something I promised I would do.  I hope you will support my first contribution to an exciting organisation brand.

It would be great if you would take the time to read the article directly on the Cure site here, and any likes, comments and sharing would be appreciated. 

The article can be found here

caricture

You may also enjoy my second Cure Magazine article “Poker Face or Cancer Card”

NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter SEPTEMBER 2017

Hi NETworkers!

Welcome to my monthly ‘Community’ newsletter. This is September 2017’s monthly summary of Ronny Allan’s Community news, views and ICYMI (in case you missed it!).

NET News

The following news items may be of interest:

 
  • The European Commission (EC) approved Lu-177 Lutathera (PRRT) on 28 Sep.  This is the first time the drug has ever been approved, despite being in use for  over 10 years.  In USA, the FDA gave a date of 28 Jan 2018 for its decision to approve or not.  Read more here.
 
  • The European Commission approved the use of XERMELO (telotristat ethyl) for use in Carcinoid Syndrome diarrhea not adequately controlled by somatostatin analogues. Read more here.
 
  • The US FDA approved an add-on indication for Lanreotide (Somatuline) for treatment of carcinoid syndrome, adding when used, it reduces the frequency of short-acting somatostatin analogue rescue therapy (….. ergo Octreotide).  Read more here.
 
  • GA-68 PET (NETSPOT) continues to roll out across the USA, see CCFs latest list by clicking here.

 

 
  • The WEGO Health Finalists were announced on 25 Sep and I’m through to the finals in all 3 awards which you nominated me for. Many thanks for the support!  I posted this info here.

Blog Site?  

Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs. You can actually sign up to receive my blog articles direct to your inbox when published – subscribe here.

 
 
 
  • The Invisible NET Patient Population.  Centred on the issue of a cohort of as yet undiagnosed people with NETs; or have been labelled with another cancer; or have been told their cancer is benign and therefor not recorded.
 
  • The WEGO Health Finalists were announced on 25 Sep and I’m through to the finals in all 3 awards which you nominated me for. Many thanks for the support!  I posted this info here.

 Other Activity

September was a slower month in ‘new’ blogging terms mainly due to personal activities (holiday) and the consequences of being ‘contactable’ by a large internet footprint! Striking a balance remains difficult, I’m keen to support and advocate but as a patient, I also need my own time.  I’m currently seeing a trend of low ‘new’ blog months, mainly due to external projects and a continuous stream of offline messages from patients (more on this later) – my strategy is constantly under review.  However, despite a low month for brand new blogs, I still managed to break through 20,000 views for the 4th month in a row…….. Thank you all so much for the support.

Please join my 2017 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer.  Please also note that I cannot accept telephone calls on a one to one basis.  Also, the number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.

Awareness Activity in September 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETS rather than just share stuff within our own community.

  • Article features.  I was featured in a well shared and positive article entitled A revolution in the treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors. A very positive look at the new treatments coming through. I didn’t agree with some of the content but ‘hey ho’ I cannot control what others write.  You can check out the article by clicking here.
  • Twitter.
    • I took part in a patient chat on twitter where I was able to contribute to some general cancer questions.  It was attended by many patient advocates representing many different conditions. The taking part in these activities is time-consuming and hard work but it does allow me to grow as a general patient advocate and to occasionally mention “Neuroendocrine Cancer” spreads awareness to new audiences.  A summary of the conversation can be found here.
    • I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of my research stuff there. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  In Sept, I tweeted 109 times on my personal account which lead to almost 75,000 views.  I was mentioned 78 times by other tweeters and gained 68 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.

  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.  Currently 336 subscribers – up 12% on last month.

  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences in addition to enriching my experience as a Patient Leader.  WEGO is a fantastic organisation!

  • Macmillan Cancer Support.  I’m proud to be a ‘Voice’ and ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum.  In addition I help ‘outliers’ from the NET community there. There are only 27 champions for a site supporting hundreds of thousand patients – it’s a community of communities.  I’ll be reporting more on this in the coming weeks.  This is the biggest cancer support organisation in the UK and I’m intent on developing relationships with various departments in this fantastic organisation.  On August 30th, one of my blogs made their “top picks” generating some NET awareness – check out Living with Cancer – 6 tips for conquering fear They have recently agreed to feature NETs on 10 Nov 17.
that’s me in the centre
  • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  I’ve not contributed yet but clearly they will be posted on all my social media outlets for you to read.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more.

Speaking Engagements

  • On 5th October, I’ve been invited to speak for around an hour at the Cardiff (South Wales) NET Patient meeting (moved from July due to forecast low attendance)  Things are starting to happen in this area and I already know their NET Specialist Dr Mo Khan who is working hard on behalf of patients.  I’m really looking forward to visiting and talking to this group.

Writing and other types of Engagement (external) – watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently.  I’m currently in a pool of patients who may be featured in a UK national, fingers crossed.

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In September, I’m very close to 380,000 views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing! On track for 400,000 by end of the October.

Facebook Milestone.  I would love to achieve 6000 followers by the end of 2017 but this will be a challenge.  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (click on ‘Like’)

These are fallback  sites to counter the Facebook algorithm whereby you may not see all my posts on the main site:

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 200 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

  • Facebook 5220.  This is a key outlet for my blog – please encourage others to like my page (if you’d like to know how to use your Facebook to invite others to my page – let me know, I can provide you with a step by step approach).
  • Twitter4153 / 3195 Follow me here @RonnyAllan1 / @NETCancerBlog
  • Total Blog Views: 379,320
  • Blog with most views: 12761 – The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer 
  • Most blog views in one day:  2043 on 15 January 2017.  Why the spike? ….. The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer” 
  • Most blog views in one week: 7538 in July 2017.
  • Most blog views in one month: 24142 in July 2017.  Why the spike? … these blogs here:
Home page / Archives More stats 2,482
Neuroendocrine Cancer Syndromes – Early Signs of a Late Diagnosis More stats 1,418
Steve Jobs – the most famous Neuroendocrine Cancer Ambassador we NEVER had More stats 1,326
Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer? 10 questions to ask your doctor More stats 1,253
Neuroendocrine Cancer – Incurable vs. Terminal More stats 1,212
Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – Grade and Stage (incorporating WHO 2017 changes) More stats 985
I’m still here More stats 869
Neuroendocrine Cancer Nutrition Blog 2 – Gastrointestinal Malabsorption More stats 846
Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – Home Page More stats 824
Ignore this post about Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 763
The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 759

WOW!  – that’s an amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments (and private messages) give me inspiration (or at least a chance to explain further) and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

 

Thanks for your great support in September.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

community_titled_transparent_2013-10-22

Ever wonder what caused your NET?

DNA strand and Cancer Cell

OPINION.  When you’re diagnosed, you go through a whole host of emotions. It’s not just the initial shock, the disbelief, the anxiety and morbid worry produced by the words “you have cancer”, it’s other stuff such as anger and denial.  With the latter, the denial normally wears off as you finally accept the predicament.

In hindsight, the anger is interesting because there can be a mixture of thoughts including “why me“, “what could I have done to head this off“; and would you believe I was even angry that my diagnosis was going to affect my performance at work and even my personal credibility.  We all react differently but in general terms our experiences can be categorised into 3 main areas: initial reaction, distress and then adjustment.

Initially, I was frustrated I didn’t know what had caused my cancer, perhaps my thinking was that I could warn others.  Those feelings soon wore off as I discovered that no-one really knows why people succumb to certain cancers.

If you don’t know what caused your NET, you’re not alone.  According to several studies in the past 10 years, around 40% of cancers are preventable indicating that up to 60% might just be plain bad luck. Clearly this figure varies between cancer types with the biggest culprits being Lung and Skin cancer with too much exposure to tobacco and ultraviolet light respectively. However, the reports also pointed out that people can and will still get these cancers without significant exposure to the commonly preventable causes. The latest study is interesting because it raises the issue that some cancers may be totally unavoidable as they are caused by random errors associated with DNA replication.  This study remains controversial because it undermines government prevention strategies. There’s a balanced article from Cancer Research UK which is a useful read (interesting quote … “Even if, as this study suggests, most individual cancer mutations are due to random chance, the researchers admit that the cancers they cause may still be preventable”).

I carried out some research and discovered the only currently known causes of NETs are heredity/genetic in nature and this only affects a small proportion of all NETs.  As for the remainder, will we ever know?  Perhaps one day but in my opinion, not anytime soon.  One interesting find is a study funded by NET Research Foundation which is designed to discover the molecular causes of a Small Intestine NET (SiNET).  In addition, they will investigate potential environmental causes, including epigenomic and infectious causes.

I often think about what actually caused my NET but I no longer worry about what the answer might be.  I’m the first to admit I could have led a healthier life (like many others) but that may not have had any impact or involvement in my cancer diagnosis.  There doesn’t seem to be any point worrying because the clock cannot be turned back …..even if I knew, I would still have metastatic NETs. However, if the cause of my cancer was connected to a heredity condition, clearly this would be important to know. That’s only my own opinion though.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

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Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!


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Neuroendocrine Cancer – let’s raise our ‘sites’

lets raise our sites

Almost every day I see something in my news feed about Neuroendocrine Cancer …. an article, a tweet, a blog post, a subscription, an alert of some kind.  Certain ones catch my eye and then something in the detail leads me to disappointment at the realisation I’d not be able to share the information because of a major flaw.  A common flaw is the failure to recognise that Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (Carcinomas and Tumors) can be found in numerous SITES in the human anatomy.  The latest article I read about Steve Jobs was a good read until I noticed it was actually about Pancreatic Cancer and inferred that a pancreatic NET was a subtype of Pancreatic Cancer.  I spend a lot of time supporting Pancreatic Cancer because they really need the support, but we do too. The latest celebrity death, Aretha Franklin, has not helped Neuroendocrine Cancer in an awareness sense.  There are huge differences between Pancreatic Cancer and Neuroendocrine Cancer with a pancreatic primary – click here to read more.

pancreatic vs neuroendocrine

Of course, there is a trend with famous NET patients being labelled with something else and I outlined this issue in my post “The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer” which already has over 25,000 hits. We need to keep clawing back some of that lost awareness. And we need to continue to emphasise that Neuroendocrine Cancer is NOT a type of another cancer PERIOD.  Click here and share please!

I once told a story in a post called Neuroendocrine – what’s that?“, about my own experience in communicating the details of my condition.  To cut a long story short, as soon as I mention my primary SITE was in the ‘intestine’, people assume I have some kind of bowel cancer. Cue – a careful explanation which doubles up as awareness.

Our situation is not helped by many ‘big hitter’ cancer organisations, who mostly tend to list cancers by anatomical SITE, nearly always in alphabetical order.  Many of them then add Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Pancreas, Lung, Appendix, to the description for Pancreatic, Lung and Appendiceal Cancer sections respectively, i.e. inferring that they are subtypes of those cancers.  I get the reason for the anatomical listing but system wide cancers also need be included, i.e. Neuroendocrine disease should be listed as an entity under N. Which bit of “Neuroendocrine tumors can occur anywhere in the body” is not understood! It is a cancer in its own right, with its own medical coding, its own classification system, its own specialists and specialist centres.  It’s not a type of another cancer!

A Neuroendocrine Tumour is NOT

The misnomer term ‘Carcinoid’ is often listed under ‘C‘ and that is part of the image and awareness problem that results when the correct nomenclature is not used, or, as is the case with many organisations, their sites are not kept up to date.

Another interesting feature of certain types of Neuroendocrine Cancer is multiple primaries.  It’s not uncommon to have multiple primary tumours but they do tend to be in the same organ or site.  However, certain uncommon types of Neuroendocrine Cancer such as Pheochromoctyomas/Paragangliomas (including hereditary versions) there can multiple primaries at different sites. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) are a group of disorders (hereditary syndromes) that affect the endocrine system. The disease typically involves Neuroendocrine Tumors in multiple endocrine glands and may cause the glands to become overactive and overproduce hormones.

I once wrote a blog using a title inspired by a patient comment – “The little suckers get everywhere”.  This was an early attempt by me to define all the locations I had gathered in from patient comments on my Facebook site.  Did I miss any?  Please let me know!

Clearly we need to ‘raise our sites’ and shout louder!  My name is Ronny Allan and I have a Neuroendocrine Cancer with a Small Intestinal Primary. I do not have Bowel Cancer!

You may also be interested in the following posts:

The little suckers get everywhere

The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer

Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine

Pancreatic Cancer vs Neuroendocrine Tumours of the Pancreas

Thanks for listening

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news. Please also support my other site – click here and ‘Like’

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NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter AUGUST 2017

background scene from my Instagram account – to see more check out the newsletter. Photo credit to Nick Lucas

Hi NETworkers!

Welcome to my monthly ‘Community’ newsletter. This is August 2017’s monthly summary of Ronny Allan’s Community news, views and ICYMI (in case you missed it!).

NET News

The following news items may be of interest:

  • PRRT takes a step forward to being formally approved in USA. FDA acknowledges receipt of revised application for approval.  Click here.
  • However, in UK, there is a threat that PRRT won’t be approved despite a positive recommendation by the scientific committee of the European Medicines Agency (EMA).  Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA), the manufacturers of Lu-177 Lutathera for use on PRRT, has had to respond to the UK’s drug approver NICE’s negative recommendation.  Read more here.
  • GA-68 PET (NETSPOT) is still rolling out across the USA, see CCFs latest list by clicking here.
  • Ipsen launches the Brazilian version of ‘Living with NETs’ website.  Click here.  (See the English language version – click here).

What’s happening on my Blog Site?  

A quiet month.  Due to the vagaries of Facebook inner workings, some of these may not have even shown on your timeline.  So, ICYMI …….here’s a summary with links, includes updated blogs.

  • The Invisible NET Patient Population.  My latest published blog and received some great viewing figures (and this continues).  Controversial for some but backed up by facts.
  • NETs – not as rare as you think. An older post with some tweaks.  Again, controversial for some but backed up by facts.
  • Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine – One of my most controversial posts – this is an older post which previously had an element of sitting on the fence. I jumped off the fence following some further research and period of reflection.  I was happy with some of the positive comments I subsequently received on this post.
  • Steve Jobs.  An updated version with some new research timelines added.  This post continues to receive hits daily even when I’m not sharing.  Most of the hits are from people searching and find my article online, an indication of the interest Steve Jobs still has today.  And many of the hits are NEW audiences.
  • NETwork with Ronny © – Community Newsletter JULY 2017.  My July 2017 newsletter ICYMI.
  • Your favourite posts.  All posts with viewing figures above 2000.

Misc Blog Stuff

  • There’s a lot of chatter about use of the word ‘fight’ in cancer parlance but many people are misrepresenting the word’s multiple meanings as per the most eminent English language dictionaries.  As for me, I’m ‘sticking to my guns’ on the subject.
  • I got some great comments on my monthly Lanreotide ‘butt dart’ post.  Feel free to add questions.  I may know some of the answers and cannot promise answers from Ipsen due to their regulatory arrangements but I will try!  Check out the discussion here …… ‘click here’.
  • My notification about the Ipsen HomeZone (or equivalent services within your own country) got an interesting response.  Since then many others have taken advantage by contacting Ipsen or their specialist asking about the service.  This has also led to feedback about the similar schemes from Novartis for Octreotide.  I’m happy that my post has provided publicity to services which help patients.  Read my post At Home with Lanreotide by clicking here.

Other Activity

August was a slower month in ‘new’ blogging terms mainly due to personal activities and the consequences of having a large internet footprint! Striking a balance is becoming more difficult.  I’m seeing a trend of low ‘new’ blog months, mainly due to external projects and a continuous stream of offline messages from patients (more on this later).  Also, I’ve been suffering with minor right hip pain but now seeing improvements working with a physiotherapist.  However, despite a low month for brand new blogs, I still managed to make the second highest monthly views ever……..Thank you all so much for the support.

Please join my 2017 awareness campaign event here (select ‘Going’)

I continue to receive a steady flow of private contacts, mainly from patients seeking information.  I don’t have an issue with private contact but please note my disclaimer.  Please also note that I cannot accept telephone calls on a one to one basis.  However …..the number of non-patients contacting me for other reasons (mainly to help with something) continues to grow and this is producing some great publicity and awareness.

By the time you read this update, the nominations and endorsements for the 2017 WEGO Health Awards will be closed.  If you remember last year, I made it to the final in two categories of Blog and Community, and then won the latter.  I should find out if I made the finals by the middle of September. Fingers crossed!  Many thanks to those who took the time and trouble to vote for me.

 

Awareness Activity in August 2017

New Audiences for NET Cancer.  From Day 1, I said it was my aim to find new audiences for NETS rather than just share stuff within our own community.

  • Article features.  I was featured in a well shared and positive article entitled A revolution in the treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors. A very positive look at the new treatments coming through. I didn’t agree with some of the content but ‘hey ho’ I cannot control what others write.  You can check out the article by clicking here.
  • Twitter. I’m ‘extremely’ active on twitter and I find a lot of my research stuff there. I also use it to support other conditions and it’s mostly returned (i.e. others help with NET awareness and are made aware of NETs in the process).  In Aug, I tweeted 130 times on my personal account which lead to almost 90,000 views.  I was mentioned 94 times by other tweeters and gained 64 new followers.  My tweet “Ignore this post” remains the most tweeted article about NETs ever posted on twitter.  Check it out – click here.
  • Daily Newsletter from my twitter feed (Nuzzel).  There is so much on twitter that I could swamp the community Facebook site so I started a twitter newsletter via an app called Nuzzel which seeks out stuff I normally like. Click this link and sign up if you think this is something you’d be interested in receiving – you don’t need to have a twitter account to read, just sign up with an email.  Currently 294 subscribers – up 10% on last month.  Will you be number 300?
  • WEGO. I continue to be featured by ‘external’ organisations such as WEGO and my PODCAST is reaching new audiences – click here.  The recent awards will continue to showcase my work which has the effect of spreading Neuroendocrine Cancer awareness to NEW audiences.
  • Macmillan Cancer Support.  I’m proud to be a ‘Community Champion’ on the Macmillan Cancer Support Forum helping ‘outliers’ from the NET community there. There are only 27 champions for a site supporting hundreds of thousand patients.  I’ll be reporting more on this in the coming weeks.  This is the biggest cancer support organisation in the UK and I’m intent on developing relationships with various departments in this fantastic organisation.  On August 30th, one of my blogs made their “top picks” generating some NET awareness – check out Living with Cancer – 6 tips for conquering fear
  • Cure Magazine.  I’ve been accepted as a ‘Cure Today’ contributor which means my articles will get a wider distribution than they do now.  I’ve not contributed yet but clearly they will be posted on all my social media outlets for you to read.  Cure Magazine has a readership of 1 million.  Click here to read more.

Speaking Engagements

  • On 5th October, I’ve been invited to speak for around an hour at the Cardiff (South Wales) NET Patient meeting (moved from July due to forecast low attendance)  Things are starting to happen in this area and I already know Dr Mo Khan who is a NET specialist working hard on behalf of patients.  I’m really looking forward to visiting and talking to this group.

Writing and other types of Engagement (external) – watch this space as I’m working on quite a few projects concurrently

Remember …….

Social Media and Stats

Blog Milestone.  In August, I tipped a 360,000 views! Thank you all so much Keep sharing! On track for 400000 by end of the October.

Facebook Milestone.  I would love to achieve 6000 followers by the end of 2017 but this will be a challenge.  The Facebook page is now my biggest outlet for awareness and education so please please please recommend this page to anyone you think would be interested.

Also check out my sister Facebook sites here (click on ‘Like’).

Ronny Allan’s Community

Neuroendocrine Cancer Awareness and Networking

Instagram

I’m expanding into Instagram to see how that goes. I’ve amassed over 200 followers to date. Initially, I’ll just be posting pictures of things that inspire me, mostly scenic photos of places I’ve been or want to go!  You can follow me here:  Click here to go to my Instagram page

Community Statistics (the measurement of my efforts on your behalf)

Figures

  • Facebook 5143.  This is a key outlet for my blog – please encourage others to like my page (if you’d like to know how to use your Facebook to invite others to my page – let me know, I can provide you with a step by step approach).
  • Twitter4091 / 3160 Follow me here @RonnyAllan1 / @NETCancerBlog
  • Total Blog Views: 360875
  • Blog with most views: 12568The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer 
  • Most blog views in one day:  2043 on 15 January 2017.  Why the spike? ….. The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer” 
  • Most blog views in one week: 7538 in July 2017.
  • Most blog views in one month: 24142 in July 2017.  Why the spike? … these blogs here:
Home page / Archives More stats 2,482
Neuroendocrine Cancer Syndromes – Early Signs of a Late Diagnosis More stats 1,418
Steve Jobs – the most famous Neuroendocrine Cancer Ambassador we NEVER had More stats 1,326
Diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Cancer? 10 questions to ask your doctor More stats 1,253
Neuroendocrine Cancer – Incurable vs. Terminal More stats 1,212
Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – Grade and Stage (incorporating WHO 2017 changes) More stats 985
I’m still here More stats 869
Neuroendocrine Cancer Nutrition Blog 2 – Gastrointestinal Malabsorption More stats 846
Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer – Home Page More stats 824
Ignore this post about Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 763
The Human Anatomy of Neuroendocrine Cancer More stats 759

WOW!  – that’s an amazing amount of awareness and hopefully, support for others.  However, I cannot do this without you guys liking, commenting and sharing!  The likes give me motivation, the comments (and private messages) give me inspiration (or at least a chance to explain further) and they also keep me humble.  The sharing gives me a bigger platform.  A bigger platform generates more awareness.

Thanks for your great support in August.  Onwards and upwards!

Thanks for reading

Ronny

Hey, I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Check out my Podcast (click and press play)

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

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