The Invisibility of Appendiceal and Colorectal NETs – do the math

The Invisibility of Appendiceal and Colorectal NETs – do the math

Patient Advocacy
Do the math not the myth In addition to my mountain of evidence against the so-called rarity of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms, a new study from US indicates that many NETs are hidden among colorectal cancer cases in cancer registries. The study reported extraordinary figures of NET cases found when analysing the data.  For years, doctors have been warning about the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer amongst younger people. For that reason, the American Cancer Society recommended people to start screening at a younger age (45 years instead of 50 years) in 2018. This would affect 22 million Americans who now are recommended screening. Colorectal covers the large intestine including the sigmoid colon and rectal cases.   You can read this article from the National Institute of Health covering the issue in US. …
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Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – not as rare as you think

Neuroendocrine Neoplasms – not as rare as you think

Awareness, Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Patient Advocacy
UPDATE AS AT 21 JAN 2023 - a leading US cancer organisation accepts that NETs are not rareI don't like to gloat, but this post is heading for its 8th birthday.   UK and Australian figures recently confirmed that Neuroendocrine Cancer is the 10th and 7th most common cancer type.  Several NET specialists in USA have been more vocal (see some graphic quotes below) than the cancer organsiations (including the ones who represent us) and disappointingly "carcinoid" use is still rife in that part of the world.  Let's hope they will now get on with moving to the new paradigm I've been suggesting for a long time.Read more in the "Meanwhile in USA" section.BackgroundAlthough initially considered rare tumours up until 10 years ago, the most recent data indicates the incidence of…
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Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine

Carcinoid vs Neuroendocrine

Awareness, Patient Advocacy
OPINIONThere's a constant debate regarding the validity of the term 'Carcinoid'.  I've posted about this a few times and as far as I know, the debate has been raging for some years.EDIT MARCH 2022.  The latest classification system for Lung Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) confirms the word "carcinoid" is now a choice - the WHO Lung Committee bottled it.  I made my choice some years ago, I hope others follow suit.  Read more about changes to Lung NEN by clicking here. EDIT APRIL 2020.  The latest classification system for Neuroendocrine Neoplasms confirms the word "carcinoid" no longer forms part of the terminology used in Digestive System tumours (effectively removing the term from GEP NETs) - read more - click hereEdit May 2020.  So, what about other areas not included in GEPNETs above? Please note there…
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