Neuroendocrine Cancer: 48 hours before diagnosis

Neuroendocrine Cancer: 48 hours before diagnosis

Humour, Inspiration
I took this photo on the evening of 24th July 2021 in the New Forest I had a liver biopsy on 19th July 2010, and I can tell you now, it wasn't exactly a walk in the park. I had a mild anaesthetic, I felt extremely uncomfortable throughout, and I was in pain. In fact, they did call in another nurse to help and her only job was to hold my hand in reassurance. I was not yet diagnosed.  Most patients report no issues with their liver biopsy.  24th July 2010 (Saturday)I was OK for a few days but on the afternoon of 24th July, I started to feel pain in my right shoulder. I normally put up with pain (via regular over the counter stuff) but this got worse throughout…
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Neuroendocrine Cancer: Fibrosis – an unsolved mystery?

Neuroendocrine Cancer: Fibrosis – an unsolved mystery?

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer, Treatment
What happened to me?Since I was diagnosed in 2010, I've always known I've had a fibrosis issue in the retroperitoneal area, as it was actually identified on my very first CT Scan, which triggered my diagnosis.  Here's how the radiologist described it - "There is a rind of abnormal tissue surrounding the aorta extending distally from below the renal vessels. This measures up to 15mm in thickness".  He went on to describe that "almost certainly malignant".  The second and third scans would go on to describe as "retroperitoneal fibrosis" and "a plaque-like substance".  Interestingly the fibrosis itself does not appear to 'light up' on nuclear scans indicating it was not cancerous (see below).I really didn't know what to make of this issue at diagnosis, although I did know the aorta…
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Does your body now have an extra organ? The MESENTERY

Does your body now have an extra organ? The MESENTERY

Living with Neuroendocrine Cancer
One of the very first words I heard at diagnosis was the word "Mesentery".  In the news today is the announcement that is now might just be a new organ following accepted findings from research conducted in the University of Limerick Ireland. I always knew it was something which held the small and large intestines in place within the abdomen so like many others, I just thought it was some kind of membrane type structure and I also knew there was some kind of interaction with the peritoneum, another word which I was to become familiar with. This is an important area for NET patients as many will have mesenteric involvement in their disease.  I've read reports of a primary mesenteric tumour although it's mainly a site for secondary disease (metastasis).  It's no surprise…
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