New Radiotracer Can Identify Nearly 30 Types of Cancer – SNMMI – 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT

see citation below

New radiotracer can identify nearly 30 types of cancer (including NETs). Future potential for therapeutic application. This is a different type of radiotracer being currently being used in the approved market for NETs.  It’s availability and timeline is not yet known.

Date: June 7, 2019

Source: Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

Summary: A novel class of radiopharmaceuticals has proven effective in non-invasively identifying nearly 30 types of malignant tumors. Using 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT, researchers were able to image the tumors with very high uptake and image contrast, paving the way for new applications in tumor characterization, staging and therapy.

Red more here. https://www.snmmi.org/NewsPublications/NewsDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=31744

Watch this space for more data on availability timeline and what type of NETs were used in the trial will follow.

To learn more about the currently approved Ga68 PET scans, check out these articles

Gallium 68 PET Scans – Into the Unknown

Neuroendocrine Cancer: Ga68 PET Scan – a game changer? 

If you can see it, you can normally detect it

Theranostics for Neuroendocrine Cancer – a find and destroy mission

Citation for graphic:

FIGURE: 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT in patients reflecting 15 different tumor entities. Maximum-intensity projections of 68Ga-FAPI PET/CT in patients reflecting 15 different histologically proven tumor entities (sorted by uptake in descending order). Ca = cancer; CCC = cholangiocellular carcinoma; CUP = carcinoma of unknown primary; MTC = medullary thyroid cancer; NET = neuroendocrine tumor.

The authors of “68Ga-FAPI PET/CT: Tracer Uptake in 28 Different Kinds of Cancer” include Clemens Kratochwil, Thomas Lindner, Labidi Abderrahim, Walter Mier, Hendrik Rathke, Manuel Röhrich and Frederik L. Giesel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Paul Flechsig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, and Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg, German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg, Germany; Annette Altmann, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; Sebastian Adeberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany; Hauke Winter, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg, German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg, Germany, and Department of Surgery, Thoraxklinik at University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Peter K. Plinkert, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Frederik Marme, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany; Matthias Lang, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Hans Ulrich Kauczor, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg, German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg, Germany, and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Dirk Jäger, Department of Medical Oncology and Internal Medicine VI, National Center for Tumor Diseases, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Applied Tumor Immunity, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; Jürgen Debus, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; and Uwe Haberkorn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg, German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg, Germany, and Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.

About the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to advancing nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, vital elements of precision medicine that allow diagnosis and treatment to be tailored to individual patients in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

SNMMI’s more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings, and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit www.snmmi.org.

Thanks for reading

Ronny

I’m also active on Facebook.  Like my page for even more news.  I’m also building up this site here: Ronny Allan

Disclaimer

My Diagnosis and Treatment History

Most Popular Posts

Sign up for my twitter newsletter

Remember ….. in the war on Neuroendocrine Cancer, let’s not forget to win the battle for better quality of life!

patients included
This is a Patients Included Site

PLEASE CONSIDER SHARING THIS POST – YOU MAY SAVE SOMEONE’S LIFE

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: